FORUM  
 
 
 
 
     Recent Posts  |   Recent Topics  |   FAQ  |   Search  |   Forum Actions  |   Quick Links Prizes
 
Notices
 
Page 1 of 23 1 2 3 4 5 6 11 21 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 456
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: A RC passage a day

  1. #1
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 43 Times
    in 20 Posts

    Default A RC passage a day

    Can we have 1 RC a day followed by explanation of the answers on the next day ?
    Awaiting responses so that we can start it ASAP....

  2. The Following 16 Users Say Thank You to joyan123 For This Useful Post:

    aeolus (24-Apr-12), ameyapatkar (09-Jun-09), apoorv.sharma (02-Jun-09), deepakarora (11-Aug-09), dipti21 (29-Jul-09), gauravgoyalbnl (10-Mar-12), jasleen1909 (05-May-16), mahi101987 (06-Jun-09), niteshkumar2010 (20-Jul-09), rakverma (18-Aug-09), santanupaul (22-Aug-09), sona345maurya (09-Jul-09), sspradeeprai@gmail.com (18-Feb-12), sumit2goody (03-Jun-09), swetataragi (17-Aug-09), tusharsem (03-Jun-09)

  3. #2
    Intern
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Locn
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 4 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Sure It would be very helpful

  4. #3
    Prometheus apoorv.sharma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 123 Times
    in 55 Posts

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by joyan123 View Post
    Can we have 1 RC a day followed by explanation of the answers on the next day ?
    Awaiting responses so that we can start it ASAP....
    Quote Originally Posted by deepak1485 View Post
    Sure It would be very helpful
    And your wish shall be granted Seems to be a great idea continuing with the culture of a question/puzzle a day. I'll make this thread a sticky, so it's easier to locate.

    Rules of the thread:
    1. Do not post post the solutions the same day as you post the passage. Let everyone take a shot at the passage and wait until the next day to post the solution keys.
    2. It's NOT compulsory to post only 1 RC a day. If you stumble upon a good passage and see that a passage has already been submitted for that day, not to worry, post yours too! The more, the merrier

    That's it..no more rules More suggestions invited as we go along.

    Happy reading!

    Cheers!

  5. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to apoorv.sharma For This Useful Post:

    arunp (04-Sep-09), gouravluvall (04-Jun-09), joyan123 (03-Jun-09), niteshkumar2010 (20-Jul-09), pinku_f1 (16-Jun-09)

  6. #4
    Prometheus apoorv.sharma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 123 Times
    in 55 Posts

    Default

    Let me do the honor of putting in the first passage.


    Recent years have brought minority-owned businesses in the United States unprecedented opportunities—as well as new and significant risks. Civil rights activists have long argued that one of the principal reasons why Blacks, Hispanics, and other minority groups have difficulty establishing themselves in business is that they lack access to the sizable orders and subcontracts that are generated by large companies. Now Congress, in apparent agreement, has required by law that businesses awarded federal contracts of more than $500,000 do their best to find minority subcontractors and record their efforts to do so on forms filed with the government. Indeed, some federal and local agencies have gone so far as to set specific percentage goals for apportioning parts of public works contracts to minority enterprises.
    Corporate response appears to have been substantial. According to figures collected in 1977, the total of corporate contracts with minority businesses rose from $77 million in 1972 to $1.1 billion in 1977. The projected total of corporate contracts with minority businesses for the early 1980’s is estimated to be over 53 billion per year with no letup anticipated in the next decade. Promising as it is for minority businesses, this increased patronage poses dangers for them, too. First, minority firms risk expanding too fast and overextending themselves financially, since most are small concerns and, unlike large businesses, they often need to make substantial investments in new plants, staff, equipment, and the like in order to perform work subcontracted to them. If, thereafter, their subcontracts are for some reason reduced, such firms can face potentially crippling fixed expenses. The world of corporate purchasing can be frustrating for small entrepreneurs who get requests for elaborate formal estimates and bids. Both consume valuable time and resources, and a small company’s efforts must soon result in orders, or both the morale and the financial health of the business will suffer.
    A second risk is that White-owned companies may seek to cash in on the increasing apportionments through formation of joint ventures with minority-owned concerns. Of course, in many instances there are legitimate reasons for joint ventures; clearly, White and minority enterprises can team up to acquire business that neither could acquire alone. But civil rights groups and minority business owners have complained to Congress about minorities being set up as “fronts (a person, group, or thing used to mask the identity or true character or activity of the actual controlling agent)” with White backing, rather than being accepted as full partners in legitimate joint ventures.
    Third, a minority enterprise that secures the business of one large corporate customer often runs the danger of becoming—and remaining—dependent. Even in the best of circumstances, fierce competition from larger, more established companies makes it difficult for small concerns to broaden their customer bases: when such firms have nearly guaranteed orders from a single corporate benefactor, they may truly have to struggle against complacency arising from their current success.



    1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
    (A) present a commonplace idea and its inaccuracies
    (B) describe a situation and its potential drawbacks
    (C) propose a temporary solution to a problem
    (D) analyze a frequent source of disagreement
    (E) explore the implications of a finding

    2. The passage supplies information that would answer which of the following questions?
    (A) What federal agencies have set percentage goals for the use of minority-owned businesses in public works contracts?
    (B) To which government agencies must businesses awarded federal contracts report their efforts to find minority subcontractors?
    (C) How widespread is the use of minority-owned concerns as “fronts” by White backers seeking to obtain subcontracts?
    (D) How many more minority-owned businesses were there in 1977 than in 1972?
    (E) What is one set of conditions under which a small business might find itself financially overextended?

    3. According to the passage, civil rights activists maintain that one disadvantage under which minority-owned businesses have traditionally had to labor(to suffer from some disadvantage or distress “labor under a delusion”) is that they have
    (A) been especially vulnerable to governmental mismanagement of the economy
    (B) been denied bank loans at rates comparable to those afforded larger competitors
    (C) not had sufficient opportunity to secure business created by large corporations
    (D) not been able to advertise in those media that reach large numbers of potential customers
    (E) not had adequate representation in the centers of government power

    4. The passage suggests that the failure of a large business to have its bids for subcontracts result quickly in orders might cause it to
    (A) experience frustration but not serious financial harm
    (B) face potentially crippling fixed expenses
    (C) have to record its efforts on forms filed with the government
    (D) increase its spending with minority subcontractors
    (E) revise its procedure for making bids for federal contracts and subcontracts

    5. The author implies that a minority-owned concern that does the greater part of its business with one large corporate customer should
    (A) avoid competition with larger, more established concerns by not expanding
    (B) concentrate on securing even more business from that corporation
    (C) try to expand its customer base to avoid becoming dependent on the corporation
    (D) pass on some of the work to be done for the corporation to other minority-owned concerns
    (E) use its influence with the corporation to promote subcontracting with other minority concerns

    6. It can be inferred from the passage that, compared with the requirements of law, the percentage goals set by “some federal and local agencies” (lines 14-15) are
    (A) more popular with large corporations
    (B) more specific
    (C) less controversial
    (D) less expensive to enforce
    (E) easier to comply with

    7. Which of the following, if true, would most weaken the author’s assertion that, in the 1970’s, corporate response to federal requirements (lines 18-19) was substantial
    (A) Corporate contracts with minority-owned businesses totaled $2 billion in 1979.
    (B) Between 1970 and 1972, corporate contracts with minority-owned businesses declined by 25 percent.
    (C) The figures collected in 1977 underrepresented the extent of corporate contracts with minority-owned businesses.
    (D) The estimate of corporate spending with minority-owned businesses in 1980 is approximately $10 million too high.
    (E) The $1.1 billion represented the same percentage of total corporate spending in 1977 as did $77 million in 1972.

    8. The author would most likely agree with which of the following statements about corporate response to working with minority subcontractors?
    (A) Annoyed by the proliferation of “front” organizations, corporations are likely to reduce their efforts to work with minority-owned subcontractors in the near future.
    (B) Although corporations showed considerable interest in working with minority businesses in the 1970’s, their aversion to government paperwork made them reluctant to pursue many government contracts.
    (C) The significant response of corporations in the 1970’s is likely to be sustained and conceivably be increased throughout the 1980’s.
    (D) Although corporations are eager to cooperate with minority-owned businesses, a shortage of capital in the 1970’s made substantial response impossible.
    (E) The enormous corporate response has all but eliminated the dangers of over-expansion that used to plague small minority-owned businesses.
    nvpkumar likes this.

  7. The Following 14 Users Say Thank You to apoorv.sharma For This Useful Post:

    a89nkita (31-Aug-09), aman15490 (16-Jun-10), ankurbhutani85 (23-Jun-09), GAURAV010 (24-Aug-09), kirans.kutty (27-Jun-09), mahi101987 (06-Jun-09), mukulbudania (04-Jun-09), niteshkumar2010 (20-Jul-09), rashid86_4u (11-Jul-09), sinjana (12-Aug-09), smrata (10-Nov-09), sumit2goody (03-Jun-09), vedant_sao (06-Aug-13), vickysen (04-Jun-09)

  8. #5
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 43 Times
    in 20 Posts

    Default

    My take on the answers:
    1) B
    2) E
    3) C
    4) B
    5) C
    6) B
    7) E
    8) C

    Explanation:
    1). (A) is ruled out because of using words like "commonplace" and "inaccuracies". Nowhere the author says that it is inaccurate. (C),(D) are irrelevant. (B),(E) seems feasible. (B) metions "potential drawbacks" which makes it the best possible option.

    2). Only (E) follows from the 2nd paragraph. All other are out-of-context of the passage.

    3). "Traditionally" is the keyword here. The first passage starts in this manner "Civil rights activists have long argued ..." So, (C)

    4). Its (B). By eliminating other options which are not true as per the passage.

    5). The last paracgraph mentions the problem that a minority-owned company may face. So, it should try to overcome that probelm which is stated in (C)

    6). From 1st paragraph ending sentence it is clear that the actions by “some federal and local agencies” are above those set by govt. Hence (B).

    7). E)...since it shows that the relative share of minority-owned business remained unchanged

    8). C) is clearly mentioned in the first few sentence of 2nd paragraph.
    (The projected total of corporate contracts with minority businesses for the early 1980’s is estimated to be over 53 billion per year with no letup anticipated in the next decade)

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to joyan123 For This Useful Post:

    pushpendersinghbarman (11-Jul-09)

  10. #6
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 43 Times
    in 20 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by joyan123 View Post
    My take on the answers:
    1) B
    2) E
    3) C
    4) B
    5) C
    6) B
    7) E
    8) C

    Explanation:
    1). (A) is ruled out because of using words like "commonplace" and "inaccuracies". Nowhere the author says that it is inaccurate. (C),(D) are irrelevant. (B),(E) seems feasible. (B) metions "potential drawbacks" which makes it the best possible option.

    2). Only (E) follows from the 2nd paragraph. All other are out-of-context of the passage.

    3). "Traditionally" is the keyword here. The first passage starts in this manner "Civil rights activists have long argued ..." So, (C)

    4). Its (B). By eliminating other options which are not true as per the passage.

    5). The last paracgraph mentions the problem that a minority-owned company may face. So, it should try to overcome that probelm which is stated in (C)

    6). From 1st paragraph ending sentence it is clear that the actions by “some federal and local agencies” are above those set by govt. Hence (B).

    7). E)...since it shows that the relative share of minority-owned business remained unchanged

    8). C) is clearly mentioned in the first few sentence of 2nd paragraph.
    (The projected total of corporate contracts with minority businesses for the early 1980’s is estimated to be over 53 billion per year with no letup anticipated in the next decade)
    Thanks Apporv for setting out so quickly.....................tremendous response..Waiting for all other versions and discussions...

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to joyan123 For This Useful Post:

    nishantsaxena09 (04-Jul-10)

  12. #7
    Available on PM sumit2goody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    8,033
    Thanks
    856
    Thanked 917 Times
    in 558 Posts

    Default Quant Concepts

    New forum on quant concepts Quantitative Concepts Check it out
    B-School Joiners,Please Click
    Moi Blog: (Taken a break) Dissociation
    Quant Thread RC ThreadVerbal Thread Leisure
    PGP Batch IIM Indore 2012

  13. #8
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 43 Times
    in 20 Posts

    Default

    Guys............please post your views......1 day over and still a single reply....

  14. #9
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 43 Times
    in 20 Posts

    Default

    Going forward with another paragraph :

    In journalism, "bias" is a word with many meanings. It suggests a
    single explanation — a conscious, even willful preference for a
    selective portrayal of a situation — for a range of instances in
    which the message does not reflect the reality. But few objective
    observers of, for instance, the reporting of campaign finance would
    argue that conventional biases are operating there. Journalists in
    general are not singling out Democrats or Republicans, liberals or
    conservatives, for praise or blame. Rather one has to look to more
    intrinsic and ingrained factors — to the "structural biases" of
    American newspapers and the "political assumptions" of their
    reporters, editors, and headline-writers — to explain bias in the
    news.
    Structural biases are rooted in the very nature of journalism — in
    its professional norms, in marketplace imperatives, in the demands
    of communicating information to an unsophisticated audience. Stories
    need identifiable actors, understandable activity, and elements of
    conflict, threat or menace. They cannot be long, and must avoid
    complexity — must focus on controversy, personalities and negative
    statistics rather than on concepts. These define the "good" story.
    As for political assumptions, all observers bring a "cognitive map"
    to American politics — a critical posture toward politics, parties,
    and politicians. For some it is as simple as "all politicians are
    crooks"; for others it involves understanding the distribution of
    power and influence in America.
    The media's particular understanding of the ways of influence and
    decision-making in government colors the way they describe political
    reality. It also defines their responsibility in reporting that
    reality; contemporary reporters are in many ways the grandchildren
    of the Progressive muckrakers. Few aspects of American politics
    reinforce this Progressive world-view as effectively as the American
    way of campaign finance. Its cash is an easy measure of influence,
    and its PACs are perfect embodiments of vested, selfish interests.
    In assuming that public officials defer to contributors more easily
    than they do to their party, their own values, or their voting
    constituency, one has the perfect dramatic scenario for the triumph
    of wealthy special interests over the will of majorities and the
    public interest.
    Structural bias and political assumption, finally, meet in an
    analytical conundrum. Structural biases dictate that newspapers
    print stories that will be read. But does the press publish a story
    because readers have been previously conditioned to accept and
    believe such accounts, or does it publish the story because of its
    conviction that it represents political truth?

    1. Which of the following best states the main idea of the
    passage?
    A. Business decisions necessary in journalism lead to
    inherent biases.
    B. The American public demands bad journalism.
    C. Two factors influence journalists reporting on campaign
    financing.
    D. Systematic bias and political assumption cause an
    analytical conundrum.
    E. Only non-profit journalism can avoid journalistic
    Biases

    2. According to the passage, which of the following would
    demonstrate structural biases inherent in journalists' work?
    I. An article that adheres loyally to Progressivist dictates
    II. An article that successfully masks its biased opinions
    III. An article that is entertaining and easily understood
    A. I only
    B. II only
    C. III only
    D. I and II
    E. II and III

    3. The author suggests in the passage that the American
    system of campaign finance:
    A. is unjust and should be reformed
    B. has exclusively served the interests of the wealthy
    C. is an easy target for journalists
    D. has been unfairly singled out for criticism by
    politicians
    E. can never overcome its inherent biases

    4. Which of the following best describes the "analytical
    conundrum" referred to in the fourth paragraph?
    A. Newspapers cynically promote Progressive ideas in which
    they do not believe.
    B. It is difficult to distinguish the roles of structural
    biases and political assumptions in publishing
    decisions.
    C. Structural biases and political assumptions exert
    conflicting pressures on newspaper publishers.
    D. Readers' preferences for dramatic news accounts
    reflecting Progressive ideas determine what is
    published.
    E.Structural biases are rooted in journalism's
    professional norms.

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to joyan123 For This Useful Post:

    nishantsaxena09 (04-Jul-10), pushpendersinghbarman (11-Jul-09)

  16. #10
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 43 Times
    in 20 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by apoorv.sharma View Post
    Let me do the honor of putting in the first passage.


    Recent years have brought minority-owned businesses in the United States unprecedented opportunities—as well as new and significant risks. Civil rights activists have long argued that one of the principal reasons why Blacks, Hispanics, and other minority groups have difficulty establishing themselves in business is that they lack access to the sizable orders and subcontracts that are generated by large companies. Now Congress, in apparent agreement, has required by law that businesses awarded federal contracts of more than $500,000 do their best to find minority subcontractors and record their efforts to do so on forms filed with the government. Indeed, some federal and local agencies have gone so far as to set specific percentage goals for apportioning parts of public works contracts to minority enterprises.
    Corporate response appears to have been substantial. According to figures collected in 1977, the total of corporate contracts with minority businesses rose from $77 million in 1972 to $1.1 billion in 1977. The projected total of corporate contracts with minority businesses for the early 1980’s is estimated to be over 53 billion per year with no letup anticipated in the next decade. Promising as it is for minority businesses, this increased patronage poses dangers for them, too. First, minority firms risk expanding too fast and overextending themselves financially, since most are small concerns and, unlike large businesses, they often need to make substantial investments in new plants, staff, equipment, and the like in order to perform work subcontracted to them. If, thereafter, their subcontracts are for some reason reduced, such firms can face potentially crippling fixed expenses. The world of corporate purchasing can be frustrating for small entrepreneurs who get requests for elaborate formal estimates and bids. Both consume valuable time and resources, and a small company’s efforts must soon result in orders, or both the morale and the financial health of the business will suffer.
    A second risk is that White-owned companies may seek to cash in on the increasing apportionments through formation of joint ventures with minority-owned concerns. Of course, in many instances there are legitimate reasons for joint ventures; clearly, White and minority enterprises can team up to acquire business that neither could acquire alone. But civil rights groups and minority business owners have complained to Congress about minorities being set up as “fronts (a person, group, or thing used to mask the identity or true character or activity of the actual controlling agent)” with White backing, rather than being accepted as full partners in legitimate joint ventures.
    Third, a minority enterprise that secures the business of one large corporate customer often runs the danger of becoming—and remaining—dependent. Even in the best of circumstances, fierce competition from larger, more established companies makes it difficult for small concerns to broaden their customer bases: when such firms have nearly guaranteed orders from a single corporate benefactor, they may truly have to struggle against complacency arising from their current success.



    1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
    (A) present a commonplace idea and its inaccuracies
    (B) describe a situation and its potential drawbacks
    (C) propose a temporary solution to a problem
    (D) analyze a frequent source of disagreement
    (E) explore the implications of a finding

    2. The passage supplies information that would answer which of the following questions?
    (A) What federal agencies have set percentage goals for the use of minority-owned businesses in public works contracts?
    (B) To which government agencies must businesses awarded federal contracts report their efforts to find minority subcontractors?
    (C) How widespread is the use of minority-owned concerns as “fronts” by White backers seeking to obtain subcontracts?
    (D) How many more minority-owned businesses were there in 1977 than in 1972?
    (E) What is one set of conditions under which a small business might find itself financially overextended?

    3. According to the passage, civil rights activists maintain that one disadvantage under which minority-owned businesses have traditionally had to labor(to suffer from some disadvantage or distress “labor under a delusion”) is that they have
    (A) been especially vulnerable to governmental mismanagement of the economy
    (B) been denied bank loans at rates comparable to those afforded larger competitors
    (C) not had sufficient opportunity to secure business created by large corporations
    (D) not been able to advertise in those media that reach large numbers of potential customers
    (E) not had adequate representation in the centers of government power

    4. The passage suggests that the failure of a large business to have its bids for subcontracts result quickly in orders might cause it to
    (A) experience frustration but not serious financial harm
    (B) face potentially crippling fixed expenses
    (C) have to record its efforts on forms filed with the government
    (D) increase its spending with minority subcontractors
    (E) revise its procedure for making bids for federal contracts and subcontracts

    5. The author implies that a minority-owned concern that does the greater part of its business with one large corporate customer should
    (A) avoid competition with larger, more established concerns by not expanding
    (B) concentrate on securing even more business from that corporation
    (C) try to expand its customer base to avoid becoming dependent on the corporation
    (D) pass on some of the work to be done for the corporation to other minority-owned concerns
    (E) use its influence with the corporation to promote subcontracting with other minority concerns

    6. It can be inferred from the passage that, compared with the requirements of law, the percentage goals set by “some federal and local agencies” (lines 14-15) are
    (A) more popular with large corporations
    (B) more specific
    (C) less controversial
    (D) less expensive to enforce
    (E) easier to comply with

    7. Which of the following, if true, would most weaken the author’s assertion that, in the 1970’s, corporate response to federal requirements (lines 18-19) was substantial
    (A) Corporate contracts with minority-owned businesses totaled $2 billion in 1979.
    (B) Between 1970 and 1972, corporate contracts with minority-owned businesses declined by 25 percent.
    (C) The figures collected in 1977 underrepresented the extent of corporate contracts with minority-owned businesses.
    (D) The estimate of corporate spending with minority-owned businesses in 1980 is approximately $10 million too high.
    (E) The $1.1 billion represented the same percentage of total corporate spending in 1977 as did $77 million in 1972.

    8. The author would most likely agree with which of the following statements about corporate response to working with minority subcontractors?
    (A) Annoyed by the proliferation of “front” organizations, corporations are likely to reduce their efforts to work with minority-owned subcontractors in the near future.
    (B) Although corporations showed considerable interest in working with minority businesses in the 1970’s, their aversion to government paperwork made them reluctant to pursue many government contracts.
    (C) The significant response of corporations in the 1970’s is likely to be sustained and conceivably be increased throughout the 1980’s.
    (D) Although corporations are eager to cooperate with minority-owned businesses, a shortage of capital in the 1970’s made substantial response impossible.
    (E) The enormous corporate response has all but eliminated the dangers of over-expansion that used to plague small minority-owned businesses.

    Waiting for more viewpoints and solution....

  17. #11
    Virtuoso IIMaterial's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    840
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 4 Times
    in 2 Posts

    Default My Take

    Quote Originally Posted by apoorv.sharma View Post
    Let me do the honor of putting in the first passage.
    1 b
    2 e
    3 c
    4 b
    5 c
    6 b
    7 b
    8 c
    Last season (as a fresher)

    CAT 2009 - 99.58
    XAT 2010 - 98.54
    FMS 2010 - 99.76


    Maybe...it's written

  18. #12
    Intern
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 3 Times
    in 2 Posts

    Smile RC

    My actual response is

    1.b
    2.e
    3.c
    4.e
    5.c
    6.b
    7.e
    8.b

    But after checking it with the given ones, they seems to be right ..

    It is good to have it daily ....

  19. #13
    Intern
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Locn
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 4 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by joyan123 View Post
    Going forward with another paragraph :

    In journalism, "bias" is a word with many meanings. It suggests a
    single explanation — a conscious, even willful preference for a
    selective portrayal of a situation — for a range of instances in
    which the message does not reflect the reality. But few objective
    observers of, for instance, the reporting of campaign finance would
    argue that conventional biases are operating there. Journalists in
    general are not singling out Democrats or Republicans, liberals or
    conservatives, for praise or blame. Rather one has to look to more
    intrinsic and ingrained factors — to the "structural biases" of
    American newspapers and the "political assumptions" of their
    reporters, editors, and headline-writers — to explain bias in the
    news.
    Structural biases are rooted in the very nature of journalism — in
    its professional norms, in marketplace imperatives, in the demands
    of communicating information to an unsophisticated audience. Stories
    need identifiable actors, understandable activity, and elements of
    conflict, threat or menace. They cannot be long, and must avoid
    complexity — must focus on controversy, personalities and negative
    statistics rather than on concepts. These define the "good" story.
    As for political assumptions, all observers bring a "cognitive map"
    to American politics — a critical posture toward politics, parties,
    and politicians. For some it is as simple as "all politicians are
    crooks"; for others it involves understanding the distribution of
    power and influence in America.
    The media's particular understanding of the ways of influence and
    decision-making in government colors the way they describe political
    reality. It also defines their responsibility in reporting that
    reality; contemporary reporters are in many ways the grandchildren
    of the Progressive muckrakers. Few aspects of American politics
    reinforce this Progressive world-view as effectively as the American
    way of campaign finance. Its cash is an easy measure of influence,
    and its PACs are perfect embodiments of vested, selfish interests.
    In assuming that public officials defer to contributors more easily
    than they do to their party, their own values, or their voting
    constituency, one has the perfect dramatic scenario for the triumph
    of wealthy special interests over the will of majorities and the
    public interest.
    Structural bias and political assumption, finally, meet in an
    analytical conundrum. Structural biases dictate that newspapers
    print stories that will be read. But does the press publish a story
    because readers have been previously conditioned to accept and
    believe such accounts, or does it publish the story because of its
    conviction that it represents political truth?

    1. Which of the following best states the main idea of the
    passage?
    A. Business decisions necessary in journalism lead to
    inherent biases.
    B. The American public demands bad journalism.
    C. Two factors influence journalists reporting on campaign
    financing.
    D. Systematic bias and political assumption cause an
    analytical conundrum.
    E. Only non-profit journalism can avoid journalistic
    Biases

    2. According to the passage, which of the following would
    demonstrate structural biases inherent in journalists' work?
    I. An article that adheres loyally to Progressivist dictates
    II. An article that successfully masks its biased opinions
    III. An article that is entertaining and easily understood
    A. I only
    B. II only
    C. III only
    D. I and II
    E. II and III

    3. The author suggests in the passage that the American
    system of campaign finance:
    A. is unjust and should be reformed
    B. has exclusively served the interests of the wealthy
    C. is an easy target for journalists
    D. has been unfairly singled out for criticism by
    politicians
    E. can never overcome its inherent biases

    4. Which of the following best describes the "analytical
    conundrum" referred to in the fourth paragraph?
    A. Newspapers cynically promote Progressive ideas in which
    they do not believe.
    B. It is difficult to distinguish the roles of structural
    biases and political assumptions in publishing
    decisions.
    C. Structural biases and political assumptions exert
    conflicting pressures on newspaper publishers.
    D. Readers' preferences for dramatic news accounts
    reflecting Progressive ideas determine what is
    published.
    E.Structural biases are rooted in journalism's
    professional norms.

    1) D

    Used POE
    A) It is just one of the case not main idea
    B) Extreme
    C) A particular case
    E) Out of scope (Non -profit journalism?)

    2) C
    Refer to para 2 structural bias refers to easy understanding only 3 fits the bill

    3) D
    used POE again

    A - out of scope
    B - Is a measure of influence but does not serve exclusive interest
    C - Is never said in the paragraph
    E - extreme

    4) C

    A - Extreme and has also not been mentioned in the paragraph
    B - Role of the factors has not been mentioned
    D - Goes against the very intent of the 4th paragraph
    E - May be but there is also another factor for analytical conundrum

  20. #14
    Intern
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 3 Times
    in 2 Posts

    Default

    my take on this one

    1.e
    2.b
    3.b
    4.c

  21. The Following User Says Thank You to Ritesh99 For This Useful Post:

    manishjain.bit (11-Jul-09)

  22. #15
    Intern
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Locn
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 4 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ritesh99 View Post
    my take on this one

    1.e
    2.b
    3.b
    4.c
    @Rithesh99
    Could please post explainations as well

  23. #16
    Intern
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 3 Times
    in 2 Posts

    Default poe

    [QUOTE=deepak1485;76368]1) D

    Used POE


    POE means ???

  24. #17
    Intern
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Locn
    Hyderabad India
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 4 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    [QUOTE=Ritesh99;76377]
    Quote Originally Posted by deepak1485 View Post
    1) D

    Used POE


    POE means ???
    Principle of Elimination .
    Basically means eliminating answers you think are wrong

  25. #18
    Prometheus apoorv.sharma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 123 Times
    in 55 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by apoorv.sharma View Post

    Recent years have brought minority-owned businesses in the United States unprecedented opportunities—as well as new and significant risks. Civil rights activists have long argued that one of the principal reasons why Blacks, Hispanics, and other minority groups have difficulty establishing themselves in business is that they lack access to the sizable orders and subcontracts that are generated by large companies. Now Congress, in apparent agreement, has required by law that businesses awarded federal contracts of more than $500,000 do their best to find minority subcontractors and record their efforts to do so on forms filed with the government. Indeed, some federal and local agencies have gone so far as to set specific percentage goals for apportioning parts of public works contracts to minority enterprises.
    Corporate response appears to have been substantial. According to figures collected in 1977, the total of corporate contracts with minority businesses rose from $77 million in 1972 to $1.1 billion in 1977. The projected total of corporate contracts with minority businesses for the early 1980’s is estimated to be over 53 billion per year with no letup anticipated in the next decade. Promising as it is for minority businesses, this increased patronage poses dangers for them, too. ......
    Here's the key for yesterday's para:
    1. B
    2. E
    3. C
    4. A
    5. C
    6. B
    7. E
    8. C

    Most of the people got all correct, apart from one or two. Good accuracy guys! Now, try and increase on your speed of reading and answering the passages. Time yourself and see if you improve, and try and balance speed & accuracy.

    Cheers!

  26. #19
    Master mukulbudania's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    139
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 17 Times
    in 8 Posts

    Thumbs up Great thread dude...

    great guys.... this is certainly a brilliant idea.... i have been facing a lot of problems in understanding the RC's n do get a lot negative in this section... hope this will certainly help me out....

  27. #20
    Prometheus apoorv.sharma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 123 Times
    in 55 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mukulbudania View Post
    great guys.... this is certainly a brilliant idea.... i have been facing a lot of problems in understanding the RC's n do get a lot negative in this section... hope this will certainly help me out....
    Definitely, I'll try and post tips as frequently as I can to crack RCs. Also, the approach I followed to solve a particular RC. It would be helpful for everyone if they could also post the approach they took, and the approximate time they took to solve that particular RC. That way we can get an understanding of how to get accustomed to various RCs and accordingly develop an approach on the spot.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 23 1 2 3 4 5 6 11 21 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
©2008-2017   Enabilon Learning Private Limited. All rights reserved