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Thread: Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

  1. #2821
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    Post Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

    Vocabulary Flashcards | Vocabulary Test
    vigorous [ VIG-er-uhs ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. energetic, robust or strong
    2. done energetically and forcefully
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     A vigorous shaking of the reactants is often required to bring about a chemical reaction.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Beijing has been pursuing vigorous diplomatic complaints against countries such as Australia and Japan, which have recently granted visas to Ms Kadeer to travel there and discuss her concerns.
    BBC, Trials due over Xinjiang riots, 24 August 2009
     
    taciturn [ TAS-i-turn ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. one who is habitually less inclined to talk
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was a taciturn man who chose his words with care.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Keshubhai Patel, a generous host to scribes clamouring for bytes, was remarkably taciturn.
    The Times of India, Modi advised to expand his cabinet, by Mohua Chatterjee, March 31, 2005
     
    betoken [ bih-TOH-kuh'n ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to indicate or give evidence of
    2. to give a sign of
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The members of the sect betoken their loyalty to the cause by a vow of obedience.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The massive queues outside hapless polling booths betoken the enthusiasm of young voters.
    BBC, Election: Disjointed thoughts from my tired brain, Paul Mason, 7 May 2010.
     
    talon [ TAL-uh'n ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a claw of an animal or a bird of prey
    2. something suggestive or in the shape of a claw
    3. the part of a lock that the key needs to press into so as to shoot the bolt
    4. the cards that are laid aside after dealing
    5. (architecture) ogee molding
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The talons were sharp and were used for self defence.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Today, hurdling superstar Gail Devers adds star power to the track as much with her bright, talon-like nails as with her talent.
    The Times of India, Super athletes sporting Olympic style, by Ruma Singh, August 28, 2004
     
    condole [ kuh'n-DOHL ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (intr. v.) to express sorrow
    2. (intr. v.) to express sympathy
    3. (tr. v.) to grieve
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He attended the funeral and condoled with the grieving family.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     I live a banished man within the bounds of my native soil; a spectator of others enriched by my birthright; an object of condoling to my relations and friends, and a condoler of their miseries.'
    BBC, Restoration Ireland, 9 June 2010.
     

  2. #2822
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    Post Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

    Vocabulary Flashcards | Vocabulary Test
    sallow [ SAL-oh ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) a sickly, yellow shade or hue of yellow
    2. (tr.v.) to cause something to become sallow
    3. (n.) a broad-leaved willow
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His sallow skin indicated that he had been sick for a long time.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The plants they really clobber include ash, hazel, and sallow. And it's characteristic of all woods with high deer densities that bramble gets heavily browsed.
    National Geographic, Deer Behind Britain's Great Bird Decline?, James Owen in the United Kingdom for National Geographic News, March 3, 2003
     
    fret [ fret ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (intr.v.) to brood or express discontent or worry
    2. (intr.v.) to gnaw into, corrode or erode
    3. (tr.v.) to vex, trouble or annoy
    4. (tr.v.) to erode or corrode away or gnaw into
    5. (n.) a mental state of being vexed, annoyed or irritated
    6. (n.) erosion or corrosion
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His nature caused him to frown upon the world and fret in a show of discontent.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     After years of wearing down metal frets and having pieces of his guitar rip off or malfunction during shows, Van Halen says he's built a guitar that even he can't destroy.
    CNN, Eddie Van Halen reinvents the guitar, By Denise Quan, February 4, 2009
     
    atypical [ ey-TIP-i-kuh'l ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. not normal or not typical
    2. not conforming to a particular type or classification
    3. unusual or irregular
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     At the meeting, the psychiatrist explained to the teachers that when an abused child displays atypical behaviour it is actually a cry for help.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Widely used guidance from the Maudsley Hospital in London has just been updated and it recommends that all patients diagnosed with schizophrenia should routinely be put on an atypical anti-psychotic.
    BBC, Doctors 'ration best mental health drugs', 8 October 2000.
     
    somnambulist [ som-NAM-byuh'-list ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     one who walks whilst asleep
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The doctors identified her to be a somnambulist.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Like a somnambulist, I reached the gate of the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, struggling to keep the drooping eyes open.
    The Times of India, Marathon on a heady morning, Indraneel Das, TNN, 15 Nov 2002
     
    vigilance [ VIJ-uh-luhns ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. watchfulness or alertness
    2. (pathology) insomnia
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Mad-Eye Moody, a character in the Harry Potter series, always advised "constant vigilance" when defending oneself against one's adversaries.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The new resolution requires states to "exercise vigilance" over the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to North Korea of small arms or light weapons.
    CNN, Defiant North Korea 'to weaponize plutonium', June 13, 2009
     

  3. #2823
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    Post Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

    Vocabulary Flashcards | Vocabulary Test
    wade [ weyd ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to pass through with difficulty
    2. (intr. v.) to walk through water
    3. (intr. v.) to make one's way with difficulty
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     They waded through the murky water to get to the other side of the road.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Competitors, many of whom wear fancy dress, waded across the river bed to the far bank and back again.
    BBC, Hundreds get dirty for Maldon Mud Race, 27 December 2009
     
    refurbish [ ree-fur-bish ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to renovate
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He refurbished his apartment so that he could sell it at a higher price.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The films are being refurbished as part of an international effort to preserve his film heritage
    CNN, Early Chaplin films, Grace Wong, 29 January 2010.
     
    archive [ AHR-kahyv ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. a record or document relating to various activities
    2. a place where historical documents and public records are kept
    3. a large collection of data
    4. to put records in an archive
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The author searched the cultural archives for content on Indian folklore for his new novel.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Starting out on the family history trail can be difficult enough without the added complication of the fact that you'll probably have to visit an archive, record office or similar institution.
    BBC, Working in Archives, Dr Nick Barratt, 23 November 2009.
     
    obliquity [ uh'-BLIK-wi-tee, oh-BLIK- ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the condition, quality or state of being oblique
    2. immorality or deviation or divergence from normal conduct
    3. a vague or obscure statement
    4. mental perversity or an instance of it
    5. deviation from a horizontal or vertical position
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     It was the obliquity of the statement that brought forth the angry reactions.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Groups of modellers in Paris, Oxford and at the Nasa Ames Research Center in the US have also modelled the climatic effects of these changes in obliquity.
    BBC, Ice belt 'encircled Mars equator', By Paul Rincon BBC News science reporter, Cambridge, 9 September 2005
     
    fortitude [ FAWR-ti-tood, -tyood ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     courage, patience, determination, firmness or the inner strength to combat adversity
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The fortitude displayed by the warriors in holding off the enemy was a sight to behold.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     We showed some fortitude and thought 'no matter what happens we're going to get to the Grand Final'.
    BBC, Sinfield issues warning to Saints, 27 September 2008
     

  4. #2824
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    indulgent [ in-DUHL-juh'nt ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
      easy-going, kindly tolerant
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He had to curtail his indulgent behaviour during those hard times.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A full account of the crisis would lay blame on interest rates kept too low for too long, poor supervision of lending and an excessively indulgent attitude towards financial innovation.
    The Telegraph, Ben Bernanke's version of history is incomplete, Edward Hadas, 24 August 2009, accessed 28 August 2009.
     
    cohorts [ KOH-hawrt ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a group of people or a company of soldiers
    2. an associate
    3. an accomplice
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The bandit and his cohorts were captured by the police.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Splitter has to be the favourite insult dealt out by tiny Marxist groupings to their former cohorts.
    BBC, Time to Jump Ship? Robin Sheeran, 8 December 2006.
     
    somber [ SOM-ber ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. dim, gloomy or dull
    2. having a dark hue or colour
    3. dismal, melancholic or despondent
    4. grim, grave or solemn
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His somber expression indicated that the operation had been unsuccessful.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Humorless guards ensure that the line moves swiftly and the atmosphere remains somber at Vladimir Lenin's resting place; his embalmed body has been on view since his death in 1924.
    National Geographic, Best of Moscow: Must-Dos
     
    celerity [ suh'-LER-i-tee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     speed or swiftness
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The celerity achieved by the car amazed everyone.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     After raiding the firm only a week ago, they arrested Mr Horie on January 23rd with unprecedented celerity.
    Economist, Livedoor, Jan 26th 2006
     
    sedition [ si-DISH-uh' n ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     rebellion or incitement against an authority or a government
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was arrested on charges of sedition.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Malaysian authorities charged three ethnic Indian activists with sedition yesterday in an apparent bid to stop a rally in support of a lawsuit that holds the British responsible for the Indians' economic woes.
    The Herald, Protest bid over £2 trillion case
     

  5. #2825
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    dyspeptic [ dis-PEP-tik ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) having a gloomy, pessimistic or morose disposition
    2. (adj.) of, pertaining to or having dyspepsia or indigestion
    3. (n.) indigestion or a person suffering from indigestion or dyspepsia
    4. (n.) ill humour or disgruntlement
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His dyspeptic outlook made him blame his failures on others.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Duncan Fletcher's dyspeptic comments about Steve Harmison, Andrew Flintoff and Matthew Hoggard were further confirmation of his awkward relationship with England's bowlers.
    Telegraph, Duncan Fletcher's attack reveals his favourites, By Derek Pringle, 22 Apr 2008
     
    odoriferous [ oh-duh'-RIF-er-uh' s ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. diffusing, yielding or giving off an odour
    2. morally offensive
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Cooking this particular type of fish is difficult because of its odoriferous nature.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Small discs of cattle blood and odoriferous gel are covered with a membrane to mimic skin, and then mosquitoes are released into the olfactometer.
    CNN, Mosquitoes have discriminating tastes, August 26, 1999
     
    mesmerize [  MEZ-muh'-rahyz  ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to hypnotize
    2. (tr. v.) to put into a trance
    3. (tr. v.) to captivate the senses
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The dancer's grace mesmerized the members of the audience.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Cryptic sea dragons ghost in and out of the fronds and giant cuttlefish mesmerize their prey with fantastic light displays.
    BBC, Science and Nature:TV and Radio follow-up, 9 September
     
    bohemian [ boh-HEE-mee-uh'n ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a native of Bohemia
    2. (n.) a person who lives and acts without regard for conventional standards
    3. (adj.) pertaining to Bohemia, its people, or their language or the unconventional life of a Bohemian
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He enjoyed roaming about the country and living a bohemian lifestyle.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     When he first hit the big time in 1996, he rocked the biggest, fluffiest Afro this side of the '70s and evoked a distinctly bohemian vibe.
    CNN, Singer Maxwell finds his way back, Denise Quan, 14 December 2009.
     
    defrock [ dee-FROK ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to unseat or deprive of ecclesiastical rank and privileges
    2. to strip of a frock
    3. to unseat or deprive of an honorary position
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The bishop defrocked the travelling preacher as he did not restrict his discourses to strict eclectically principles.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A former vicar who was sacked and defrocked after a church court found him guilty of adultery has been denied permission to launch an appeal against the ecclesiastic ruling.
    BBC, Defrocked vicar refused appeal, 23 October 1998.
     

  6. #2826
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    sloth [ slawth or, especially for 2, slohth ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. laziness, indolence or an aversion to hard work
    2. any of numerous sluggish, arboreal, edentate mammals of the family Bradypodidae of South and Central America, that possess long hooklike claws using which they hang upturned from branches of trees and that feed on buds, fruits, and leaves
    3. a company or pack of bears
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Sloth and a disposition to procrastinate caused him to lose his job.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     On the beach, the kids cavort with white-faced monkeys and snap numerous photos of sloths, iguanas and birds.
    CNN, Costa Rica adventures keep kids on the go, By Eileen Ogintz, August 25, 2008
     
    gorge [ gawrj ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a ravine or narrow passage or cleft that has rocky sides
    2. (n.) one's gullet or throat
    3. (tr.v.) to eat, stuff or devour food greedily
    4. (intr.v.) to greedily consume food
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     This particular gorge was considered to be the deepest in the world.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Hundreds of tourists filed out of tour buses, trains and other vehicles Thursday, destined to view the mile-deep gorge well known around the world.
    abcNews, Grand Canyon Celebrates 90th Year as National Park, By FELICIA FONSECA Associated Press Writer, February 27, 2009
     
    morose [  muh'-ROHS  ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) sullen or gloomy
    2. (adj.) characterised or marked by a gloomy or sullen disposition
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was too morose to do his work the other day.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     As she took the class on a morose trudge through various aspects of the Bill, telling us that immigration has brought us economic benefits "but it should not be a substitute for upskilling the domestic workforce", we remembered why she was always such a dull teacher.
    The Telegraph, MPs' expenses: School bell sounds early for overjoyed Miss Smith, Andrew Gimson, 3 June 2009
     
    aver [ uh'-VUR ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to assert, declare, state or affirm as the truth or fact
    2. (law) to declare or state formally
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He averred that he would win the game.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Now, there will be some who will aver that there is a "Scottish dimension" to the issue of compulsory ID cards.
    Telegraph, Scottish Parliament must do the math before its next ID cards crisis, By Alan Cochrane, 19 Dec 2008
     
    vapid [ VAP-id ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. insipid, dull, tasteless or lifeless
    2. boring, uninteresting or lacking zest
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The novel was described as a vapid read.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     She said she began writing for children after struggling to find any books that were not "vapid and vacant" to read to her children, or that actually taught any lessons.
    BBC, Madonna records book message, 3 September, 2003
     

  7. #2827
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    vie [ vahy ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to compete or struggle for supremacy
    2. (intr.v.) to strive for victory or compete
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She vied for the position for six years.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Several Germans will vie to set a record for the Most Juice Extracted from Grapes by Treading.
    CNN, Thousands pursue wacky world records, November 13, 2008
     
    voluminous [ vuh'-LOO-muh'-nuh's ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. bulky or having a large size or volume
    2. ample, sufficient or full
    3. winding or having a large number of coils
    4. lengthy or filling a large volume or a large number of volumes
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The voluminous fold of her skirt dragged behind her.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Giggling, he helps me fold and pin my voluminous headscarf under it.
    BBC, Southern Iraq diary: Basra, 17 March, 2004
     
    derivative [ di-RIV-uh'-tiv ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) one that has been derived from something else
    2. (adj.) not original, copied or secondary
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The derivative did not possess any properties of the original substance.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Milan is losing money on the derivatives contract it took out with the banks, which allowed it to swap a fixed rate of interest on the bonds for a variable rate.
    Telegraph, Italian bond scandal could ensnare banks, By Katherine Griffiths, Financial Services Editor, 05 Jan 2009
     
    dissimulate [ di-SIM-yuh'-leyt ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to conceal, disguise or hide one's true motives or feelings by using a false appearance
    2. (intr.v.) to dissemble or conceal one's true motives by means of a pretence or disguise
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He dissimulated information because he was working undercover.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Those who know not how to dissimulate, know not how to rule.
    Telegraph, We are all liars and behave worse in private than we pretend in public, By Adam Nicolson, 28 Feb 2004
     
    mulct [ muhlkt ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) penalty or fine
    2. (tr.v.) to punish or penalize by means of a fine
    3. (tr.v.) to swindle or extract or obtain money by trickery or fraudulent means
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     A mulct was levied on travellers carrying alcohol.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It would certainly be ungenerous to mulct the Queen for the cost.
    Telegraph, Victoria was not amused over paying Jubilee bill, By Michael Smith, 26 Jul 2001
     

  8. #2828
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    wraith [ reyth ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a spectre or ghost
    2. a ghostly apparition of a person that is supposedly seen as an omen just before his death
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The wraith was seen once every year.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It was the mangroves he noticed first, reduced to cobwebbed wraiths as far as the eye could see.
    Economist, Arthur Galston, Jun 26th 2008
     
    assay [ v. a-SEY; n. AS-ey, a-SEY ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to examine, assess or analyse
    2. (intr.v.) to be shown or displayed after conduction of an analysis
    3. (n.) an assessment or examination or a report of such an analysis
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The evidence was assayed by the police.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Towards the end of his life, Sir Arthur Eddington, who died in 1944, assayed a "theory of everything". Experimental evidence ran counter to his work, which today generates only intermittent interest.
    Telegraph, Maths into English, Simon Ing, 27 Sep 2007
     
    modish [ MOH-dish ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     fashionable, modern, stylish or chic
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Her modish sense of style set her apart from the other First Ladies.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The medispa is a 'modish' space to heal and rejuvenate the mind, body and soul.
    The Times of India, Spa with a difference, Nona Walia, TNN, 2 Mar 2008
     
    oblivious [ uh'-BLIV-ee-uh's ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. unaware or unconscious
    2. forgetful
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The poor employee was oblivious to the fact that her contract had been terminated by her employer.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A single gene may control why some people are sensitive to the slightest smell of sweat, while others appear oblivious to the odour.
    BBC, Gene controls response to sweat, 31 October 2007
     
    wend [ wend ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to direct or proceed along (one's way)
    2. (intr.v.)to proceed or travel
    3. (n.) one of the Slavic people of Lusitania
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He wended his way through the jungle to get to the city.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     On Wednesday night, senators voted 90-9 to include the provision to the $440 billion Defense Department spending bill now wending its way through Congress.
    CNN, Senate ignores veto threat in limiting detainee treatment, 6 October 2005
     

  9. #2829
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    sham [ sham ]
     noun, verb, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) something false that is alleged to be genuine
    2. (n.) a person who feigns illness or pretends
    3. (n.) a cover up or giving a false outward appearance
    4. (adj.) feigned or pretended
    5. (v.) to pretend or put on false appearances
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The investigation was a sham as the detectives were not keen on catching the culprit.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A man jailed for arranging sham marriages in Northern Ireland has launched a legal bid to avoid deportation to Nigeria.
    BBC, Sham marriage scammer to fight deportation, 4 February 2010.
     
    implement [ n. IM-pluh'-muh'nt; v. IM-pluh'-ment ]
     noun, verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) an instrument or tool or equipment
    2. (n.) a means of or an agent
    3. (v.) to carry out or perform
    4. (v.) to put into effect
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He went into town and bought the gardening implements that he needed.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The Joint Chiefs of Staff say they'll need time to implement changes if "don't ask, don't tell' is repealed.
    CNN, Pentagon preparing repeal of 'don't ask, don't tell' policy, 2 February 2010.
     
    bereaved [ bih-REEVD ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) being greatly saddened at the death of a loved one
    2. (adj.) grief-stricken or suffering the loss of a loved one
    3. (n.) a person or persons who have lost a loved one (the bereaved)
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     After the burial service, friends tried to comfort the bereaved family.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     In addition, the chaplaincy service available in all hospitals across Wales works within the wider patient support team to provide comfort and support to people who have been bereaved.
    BBC, Bereaved children 'not supported', 16 January 2009.
     
    laudatory [ LAW-duh'-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. expressing admiration
    2. commendable
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His laudatory remarks went a long way in boosting the confidence of his son.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The Karachi stock market rose more than 100 points in three days in the wake of Mr Bush's laudatory remarks.
    BBC, Musharraf thrives on US support, Aamer, Ahmed Khan, 8 December 2004
     
    expunge [ ik-SPUHNJ ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to erase or strike out
    2. to annihilate or wipe out
    3. to eliminate
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He expunged the various repetitions and resubmitted his report.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A victory for him on 4th November would help expunge the original sin of slavery from Jefferson's empire of liberty.
    BBC, US election has echoes in the past, Professor David Reynolds, 15 September 2008.
     

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    manacle [ MAN-uh'-kuh' l ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) fetters, handcuff or shackle to confine the hands
    2. (n.) a restraint, limitation or curb
    3. (tr.v.) to fetter or handcuff
    4. (tr.v) to hamper, bind or restrain
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Manacles were placed on his hands and feet in order to restrict movement.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Tory project leaders have made it clear the convicts, who roamed freely and were not manacled, were separate to their project teams.
    Telegraph, Tory Rwandan project given President's backing, By Andrew Porter Political Editor in Kigali, 08 Aug 2008
     
    libel [ LAHY-buh'l ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. slander in any form other than by speech and actions
    2. the act of publishing defamatory material
    3. the written statement of a plaintiff in a legal matter
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He sued the rich businessman for libel after the businessman made a statement against him in an interview.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     L'Unita is the fourth newspaper to be sued for libel by the billionaire prime minister.
    The Telegraph, Berlusconi to give evidence in court against impotency claims, Nick Squires, 6 September 2009
     
    somnolent [ SOM-nuh'-luh' nt ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. sleepy, dozy or drowsy
    likely to induce drowsiness or sleep
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Her somnolent behaviour made everyone think she was drunk.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     George Bush, by contrast, appeared tentative, if not somnolent: unsure of himself and the issues.
    CNN, Bill Press: Gore finally hits his stride, By Bill Press/CNN
     
    heedless [ HEED-lis ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     inconsiderate, unmindful, thoughtless or careless
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His heedless actions came back to haunt him in the future.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The shoes... were a lesson to all Arab leaders and their representatives, who have been heedless of the Arab masses, their demands and sentiments.
    BBC, Mid-East press deplores Maher attack, 23 December, 2003
     
    chronicle [ KRON-i-kuh'l ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a history or an extended narrative report of historical events presented in a time sequence
    2. (n.) a detailed record of events
    3. (tr. v.) to record in historical format
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Many who start reading the chronicle of the knight in shining armour find it so interesting that they cannot stop till they reach the end.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The girl had chronicled two years of the emotions and fears that gripped her during hiding, as well as candid thoughts on her family, her feelings for friend-in-hiding Peter van Pels, and dreams of being a professional writer.
    CNN, Miep Gies, Anne Frank protector, dies at 100, 11 January 2010.
     

  11. #2831
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    bolster [ BHOL-ster ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a pillow or a cushion
    2. (n.) a pad or something used as a support
    3. (tr.v.) to support, uphold or prop up
    4. (tr.v.) to hearten or cheer up
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She asked for a bolster on the plane as the seats were very uncomfortable.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Now that they have the explicit backing of the authorities, it should help to bolster the housing market which has been the source of so many of the US's economic problems.
    BBC, US rescues giant mortgage lenders, By Greg Wood, 8 September 2008
     
    burnish [ BUR-nish ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to burnish or make shiny by rubbing
    2. (n.) polish, gloss or shine
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     They burnished the artefacts to be displayed.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The last vestiges of sunlight gild and burnish the pink walls.
    National Geographic, On Lake Powell, Kayaking a Reemerging Canyon, Gretchen Reynolds, August 12, 2003
     
    exude [ ig-ZOOD, ik-SOOD ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to project abundantly or radiate
    2. (tr. v.) to send out or emit through pores or small openings.
    3. (intr. v.) to gradually come out through pores or to ooze out
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He had a positive outlook on life and exuded optimism wherever he went.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     This is supposed to be the phase of the campaign when Woods exudes a steely invulnerability, but he heads south to the Players Championship at Sawgrass this week in fear of embarrassment.
    The Telegraph, Tiger Woods humbled at Quail Hollow as the magic disappears, Oliver Brown, 1 May 2010.
     
    squalid [ SKWOL-id, SKWAW-lid ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. dirty, foul, filthy, wretched
    2. sordid or morally degraded
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The squalid conditions prevalent in the last century gave rise to many diseases.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Conditions in the cells were squalid and lacked decency
    BBC, Police cell condition 'squalid', 6 August 2008
     
    solicitous [ suh'-LIS-i-tuh' s ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. displaying concern, anxiety or eagerness
    careful, cautious or meticulous
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Her solicitous behaviour was regarded as fake.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     For reasons not entirely clear to me, Stark repairs to his home lab and, with the help of a robot more solicitous than Luke Skywalker's R2D2, improves upon his original metal suit, transforming it into a gleaming red and gold mannequin reminiscent of Hollywood's Oscar award.
    Chronicles Magazine, Wogs, by George McCartney
     

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    mountebank [ MOUN-tuh'-bangk ]
     noun, intransitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) one who, in a public place or from a platform, tells audiences stories and tricks them into buying quack medicines from himself or herself
    2. (n.) a charlatan, boastful pretender or quack
    3. (intr.v.) to operate, behave or act like a charlatan or mountebank
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The mountebank was arrested by the police on charges of selling drugs without prescriptions.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It somehow comes as no surprise to discover that this prince of mountebanks was also a close friend of the Duke of Windsor.
    Telegraph, John Brinkley, the goat-gland quack, Mike Dash, 16 Apr 2008
     
    disabuse [ dis-uh-byooz ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to free from error or misconception
    2. (tr. v.) to free from falsehood
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The lawyer successfully disabused the witness of her confidence in her statement as a witness.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     His conversation was always instructive but never pedantic; his taste was as accurate as it was, at times, licentious; his appetite refined and insatiable; his humour at once generous and disabused.
    The Telegraph, Victor Arwas, 2 May 2010.
     
    seraphic [ si-RAF-ik ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. pure or angelic
    2. of or pertaining to an angel or seraph
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Her seraphic appearance fooled everyone.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     In response I gave a smile of seraphic serenity.
    The Times of India, Desibel power, JUGULAR VEIN/JUG SURAIYA, 18 Apr 2004
     
    inalienable [ in-EYL-yuh'-nuh'-buh' l, -EY-lee-uh'- ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     inviolable, inherent, basic or unassailable
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His claim to his family's holdings was inalienable.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     According to IRNA, the Iranian president told the French interviewer that his country's nuclear activities are legal, "based on the country's legal and inalienable rights" and that the program would "continue without hesitation."
    CNN, Ahmadinejad rejects U.N. sanctions, March 25, 2007
     
    waft [ waft, wahft  ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to propel or cause to move gently on a buoyant medium
    2. (intr.v.) to float or drift gently esp. on the air
    3. (n.) one, like sound or odour, that can be perceived faintly
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     We got the waft of the cake even through the closed door.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The aroma of freshly baking flatbread wafts through the air as a unit of British soldiers position themselves for a quick patrol around the village of Sindh Kalay.
    CNN, British Army builds mock Afghan village in English countryside, By Atika Shubert CNN, July 2, 2009
     

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    serendipity [ ser-uh' n-DIP-i-tee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an instance or phenomenon where good luck or fortune is found accidentally
    2. an aptitude or gift of accidentally finding good luck or fortune
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He could not believe that serendipity was a reason behind his success.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     And the results, which are published in the August issue of the journal GSA Today, were ""a bit of serendipity,"" Stanley said.
    National Geographic, Ancient ""Lost"" City's Remains Found Under Alexandria's Waters, Dan Morrison in Alexandria, Egypt for National Geographic News, July 31, 2007
     
    incriminate [ in-KRIM-uh'-neyt ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to accuse of, charge with or provide proof for the commitment of a crime
    2. to implicate or cause to look guilty of a crime
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was incriminated on charges of treason.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He was sent to Dunkirk in the hope he might incriminate himself and others but that plan failed and he was later jailed.
    BBC, British sent fascist to frontline, 3 March 2009
     
    valedictory [ val-i-DIK-tuh'-ree ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) saying good-bye or bidding farewell
    2. (adj.) pertaining to a departure or farewell
    3. (n.) a farewell speech
    3. (n.) a speech given at the graduation exercises of a college or school
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Everyone clapped after the valedictory speech given by the general secretary of the student body.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Headed for the minority and the back benches come January, House Speaker Dennis Hastert offered his valedictory to colleagues Friday night, saying he was "proud to be part of this unique time in the history of our country."
    CNN, Hastert offers farewell as he prepares to head for back benches, 8 December 2006.
     
    seine [ seyn ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a fishing net that hangs vertically in the water with floats at the upper edge and weights at the lower edge
    2. (tr. v.) to catch fish with a net which is hung vertically in the water
    3. (intr. v.) to fish with a vertical net
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Our team used a seine and caught ninety-seven fishes in just one hour.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Most notorious are the purse seine nets, up to three miles long, used to encircle and 'bag up' huge numbers of fish.
    The Telegraph, Tuna fishing: The fairest catch, Rose Prince. 11 March 2010.
     
    giddy [ GID-ee ]
     verb, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) dizzy or causing dizziness
    2. (adj.) frivolous
    3. (v.) to become or make dizzy
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He felt giddy after the ride on the merry-go-round.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Republicans have been downright giddy following the off-year elections in Virginia and New Jersey.
    CNN, Are Republicans too giddy? Julian E. Zelizer, 10 November 2010.
     

  14. #2834
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    scourge [ skurj ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a whip or a lash
    2. (n.) a person who administers punishment or severe criticism
    3. (n.) a cause of calamity or affliction
    4. (tr. v.) to punish by whipping
    5.(tr. v.) to chastise or criticize severely
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Anyone caught stealing would be administered twelve strokes of the scourge in the market square.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He was elected as a nationalist reformer, the scourge of the landowning classes.
    The Telegraph, Hot on the heels of Imelda Marcos, Nick Meo, 2 May 2010.
     
    precipitant [ pri-SIP-i-tuh'nt ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) rushing headlong
    2. (adj.) rash, hasty or acting impulsively in thought or action
    3. (adj.) happening abruptly or suddenly
    4. (n.) anything that causes precipitation
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The manager's precipitant decision to hire cheap labour resulted in the recruitment of inefficient people who did little or no productive work.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
      But you said recently, ... there is no alternative to the occupation in Iraq, it's an inevitable consequence of precipitant military action, withdrawal is unthinkable. ... You couldn't at this point guarantee that Britain and America could pull out at that stage, could you?
    BBC, Election campaigns, 16 May 2004.
     
    sapient [ SEY-pee-uh' nt ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. sagacious, wise or shrewd
    2. pertaining to or of humans viz. homo sapiens
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His sapient inputs made the presentation a success.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     As Andrei Piontkovsky, a sapient Russian commentator, points out, an alliance between Russia and China would be like one between a rabbit and a boa constrictor, with Russia as the lapine element.
    The Economist, The new cold what?, Sep 4th 2008
     
    sardonic [ sahr-DON-ik ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     cynical, mocking, scornful or sarcastic
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He regarded her with a sardonic expression on his face.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     As the composer's current worldwide champion, he was undaunted by the music's contradictions, whereby bitter and sweet, icy and graceful, harsh and witty, big and small, romantic and unromantic, sardonic and sentimental, delicate and bludgeoning are qualities that go together.
    The Herald, London Symphony Orchestra, Usher Hall, CONRAD WILSON, August 18 2008
     
    fritter [ FRIT-er ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a shred or a small piece, portion or fragment
    2. (tr.v.) to squander or waste
    3. (tr.v.) to shred or break into tiny fragments
    4. (intr.v.) to dwindle, dissipate, degenerate or shrink
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He is an expert tracker, who made use of a single fritter to solve his last case.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The speech made reference both to the healthcare and education reforms Mr Obama plans, and also the desire not to fritter away tax dollars.
    BBC, Determined Obama vows to renew US, 25 February 2009
     

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    unearthly [ uhn-URTH-lee ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. seeming not to belong to this world
    2. supernatural
    3. unreasonable or uncustomary
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She screamed in such and unearthly voice that it scared the entire household.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     His bemused clients were then asked to sign statements confirming that they witnessed him "controlling a voice or set of voices that are unearthly in nature".
    The Telegraph, Jaycee Lee Dugard: Phillip Garrido and the 'unearthly' voices, John Bingham, 28 August 2009.
     
    whelp [ hwelp, welp ]
     noun, verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) the young of any mammal
    2. (n.) a despised youth or an impudent young person
    3. (n.) the teeth of a sprocket wheel
    4. (v.) to give birth to
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The lioness watched over her whelps as they playfully tumbled in the grass.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He had described the heroine as appearing "like a tigress robbed of her whelps".
    The Telegraph, Many a good book is undone by its cock-ups, Christopher Howse, 21 April 2010.
     
    slough [ slou or sluhf ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (intr.v.) to get shed or cast off
    2. (tr.v.) to dispose off, get rid of or shed
    3. (n.) swamplike region
    4. (n.) a condition or state of degradation or helplessness
    5. (n.) the outer layer of a snake's skin, which it periodically casts off
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The electoral candidate sloughed off her former campaign workers as she felt they were the cause of her loss during the previous elections.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The supreme leader declared last week's presidential election a "definitive victory" for President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and sloughed off charges of vote tampering.
    CNN, Iran's supreme leader warns protesters, 19 June 2009.
     
    interregnum [ in-ter-REG-nuh'm ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an interval of time between the close of a sovereign's reign and the accession of a legitimate successor
    2. any period during which a state has a temporary executive in place of a ruler
    3. any period of freedom or interruption in continuity from the usual authority
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     After the king's death, there was an interregnum of a month before the prince was officially crowned.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The bad news may be that, after the brief Dubya interregnum, a second Clinton regime lies just down the road.
    CNN, Hillary's first step to a second Clinton White House, 23 October 2000.
     
    scintilla [ sin-TIL-uh' ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a spark, flash or a miniscule particle
    2. an iota or miniscule amount
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     A scintilla of attraction is often enough for people to fall in love.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He said prosecutors had offered "not one scintilla of proof" otherwise.
    CNN, More protests planned over acquittal of officers in Diallo case, February 26, 2000
     

  16. #2836
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    lave [ leyv ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to wash, bathe or cleanse
    2. (tr.v.) to lap or flow past
    3. (intr.v.) to wash, clean or bathe
    4. (n.) residue or left over
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was laved with sweet smelling soaps to get rid of the stench.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Pressure on Syria to lave Lebanon has intensified since the 14 February car bomb death of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri.
    BBC, UN chief warns Syria over Lebanon, 25 February, 2005
     
    levity [ LEV-i-tee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the quality of being frivolous
    2. a light-hearted manner
    3. the state of being buoyant
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His levity was very well received in the humdrum office atmosphere.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Comedians and actors such as Steve Carell and Jamie Foxx brought some comic levity to the inauguration of a president who will face some serious problems in just a few days.
    CNN, Obama at concert: The dream of our founders will live on, 18 January 2009
     
    evanescent [ ev-uh'-NES-uh'nt ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. fleeting or tending to fade away
    2. vanishing
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     For one moment, she thought the evanescent shadow created by the moonlight was a ghost.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A growing number of college professors are using film, audio clips and PowerPoint presentations to play to their students' strengths and capture their evanescent attention.
    CNN, Are kids too plugged in? 20 March 2008.
     
    dribble [ DRIB-uh'l ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v. ) let fall or flow in a trickle
    2. (intr. v.) to trickle or flow in small amounts
    3. (intr. v.) to drool or slaver
    4. (intr. v.) to advance with the ball in play
    5. (n.) a trickle
    6. (n.) a small amount
    3. (n.) the act of advancing with the ball in play
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The gushing river had been reduced to a dribble during the dry spell.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The details of misinformation that dribble into our lives (like fears about "enough protein") follow naturally from this fact and have been reflected upon in detail by writers like Marion Nestle.
    CNN, Food industry dictates nutrition policy, Jonathan Safran Foer, 30 October 2009.
     
    gust [ guhst ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. a sudden blast of wind
    2. a burst of water or an abrupt rush of
    3. an out burst of feelings or emotions
    4. to blow all of a sudden
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He tried to hold onto his hat but it was blown off his head by a sudden gust.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Keep both hands on the wheel, particularly if you're being buffeted by the wind or the slipstreams of other vehicles, and anticipate stronger winds and gusts on exposed stretches of road or when passing high-sided vehicles.
    The Telegraph, Gale warnings for northern Britain, Alastair Jamieson, 3 October 2009.
     

  17. #2837
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    simulate [ SIM-yuh'-leyt ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to take on the appearance of or create a likeness
    2. to make a pretense of
    3. to imitate
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He simulated the accident using computer generated images.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It is this aspect that allows delicate and critical procedures to be realistically simulated.
    BBC, Simulator promises safer surgery, 25 february 2000.
     
    tessellated [ TES-uh'-ley-tid ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. having the pattern of small squares or mosaic
    2. having the appearance of or pertaining to mosaic
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The tessellated floor and scenic walls heighten the light-hearted setting of the children's playroom.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Its tessellated façade, inspired by a Paco Rabanne dress, became a symbol of the city's regeneration and even ended up on a postage stamp.
    The Telegraph, The library has landed, Ellis Woodman, 31 March 2007.
     
    soliloquy [ suh-LIL-uh'-kwee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an act or instance when one talks to oneself
    2. a monologue or speech in a drama where the character expresses his feelings and thoughts to the audience by means of talking to himself or herself rather than by talking to the other characters
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Her habit of soliloquy caused her to be termed crazy.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Yet because Sterling has made his own impact as a writer of fiction, he uses as his theme the famous "all the world's a stage" soliloquy describing the seven stages of life from Shakespeare's "As You Like It."
    CNN, Author takes a peek at the future in 'Tomorrow Now', By Renay San Miguel, February 26, 2003
     
    miscegenation [ mi-sej-uh'-NEY-shuh' n, mis-i-juh'- ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. marriage or interbreeding between a man and a woman who belong to different races
    2. hybridization or mixture
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Miscegenation was discouraged in olden times.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Simply because miscegenation ends up confusing not only flavours, it tends to negate the beneficial properties of systematically evolved regional food habits.
    The Times of India, COUNTERVIEW regional food loses its efficacy, 18 Sep 2004
     
    mite [ mahyt ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. any of several small acarid arachnids that are often parasitic and infest animals, plants, and stored foods and include important disease vectors
    2. a small amount or sum of money
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Mites, because of their small size, often go unnoticed.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A respiratory condition in which the lung airways are chronically inflamed, asthma can be triggered by substances other than pet dander, such as dust mites, exhaust, smoke, and cold air, or even allergens from rodents and cockroaches.
    CNN, What to do if you're allergic to your pet, By Ray Hainer, August 13, 2009
     

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    pigment [ PIG-muh'nt ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a colouring matter or a substance that gives colour to
    2. (tr. v.) to colour or add colour to
    3. (intr. v.) to become coloured
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Powdered pigment was mixed with oil and used to paint the barn.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Vitiligo is a condition in which areas of skin lose their normal pigment and become white.
    BBC, Pepper 'to treat pigment disease', 14 February 2008.
     
    diverge [ dih-VURJ, dahy ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to branch off or move in different directions from a given point
    2. (tr. v.) to swerve, turn aside from or deviate
    3. (intr. v.) to deflect or cause to turn away from
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The tourists were told that they were likely to get lost if they diverged from the path.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     But the final results could diverge greatly from the polling numbers because it is more likely that a person who tells a pollster that he or she is going to attend a caucus may not do so.
    CNN, Iowa caucuses 101: Arcane rules have huge impact on outcome, 3 January 2008.
     
    lambast [ lam-BEYST, -BAST ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     to beat or denounce severely
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Instead of verbally lambasting politicians, the middle class in India would be better served if they were to be active participants in the democratic process and be vigilant citizens at all times.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The prime minister, who lambasts his main rival as a "shallow salesman", has been unable to sell himself.
    The Economist, Bagehot:Captain Malaprop, Jun 26th 2008
     
    abeyance [ uh'-BEY-uh'ns ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. suspension, cessation or postponement
    2. (law) a condition or state where ownership of an estate isn't established or determined
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Abeyance of his death sentence was seen in a negative light.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     With Saturday's crucial match looming, both sides have put the dispute in abeyance for 48 hours.
    Telegraph, Wasps' players in contract stand-off, by Brendan Gallagher, 19 Dec 2008
     
    paraplegic [ par-uh'-PLEE-jee-uh', -juh' ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. someone who is suffering from paraplegia
    2. one who is afflicted by the paralysis of the lower half of the body due to some injury to the spinal cord
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The paraplegic in the hospital refused medication as he did not wish to live any longer.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Mikheyev threw himself out his cell window to escape his tormentors, landed on a police motorcycle and broke his back, rendering him a paraplegic.
    Newsweek, Russia: A Phone Call to Putin, Anna Nemtsova, Mar 13, 2006
     

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    plethora [ PLETH-er-uh' ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a very large amount, superfluity or overabundance
    2. an abnormality which is characterized by excessive blood in the circulatory system or in some organ or area of it
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was an enigmatic man with a plethora of achievements.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Bedrooms, spread over two floors of a shuttered building, are compact, but well kept, air-conditioned, en-suite and jollied up by a plethora of paintings of traditional Spanish scenes.
    Telegraph, Madrid's best budget hotels, Fred Mawer, 23 Sep 2008
     
    deducible [ di-du-ci-ble ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to infer from a general principle
    2. to reach a conclusion from something known or assumed
    3. to trace the course of
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Applications to the theory are deducible only after understanding the theory.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The approximate age of a lobster can be deduced from its weight.
    BBC, NY eatery frees ancient lobster, 10 January 2009
     
    disproof [ dis-PROOF ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an act or refuting
    2. evidence that refutes or disproves
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The authenticity of the letter was a clear disproof to his statement.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     One storm or one flood in itself is not proof or disproof of global warming.
    CNN, No respite for flood victims, 2 November 2000
     
    intrigue [ v. in-TREEG; n. in-TREEG, IN-treeg ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a scheme or the practice of secret underhand schemes
    2. (intr. v.) to plot or engage in secret underhand schemes
    3. (tr. v.) to effect by secretly plotting and scheming
    4. (tr. v.) to arouse the curiosity of
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He lost his job as he was unprepared for the intrigue of his co-workers.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The prelude to this match had more intrigue, plots and subplots than a week in Westminster.
    The Telegraph, Birmingham City 1 West Ham United 0: match report, Sandy Macaskill, 13 December 2009.
     
    malaise [ ma-LEYZ, -muh-; Fr. mA-LEZ ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a condition of general weakness
    2. a vague feeling of uneasiness
    3. a feeling of depression or discomfort
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The doctor said that the malaise could develop into pneumonia.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The current economic malaise is only likely to make worse the rate at which debt can be recovered.
    BBC, Benefit repayments 'must improve significantly', 17 March 2010.
     

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    roil [ roil ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to disturb, render turbid or disorder by stirring up sediment in a liquid
    2. (tr.v.) to irritate, vex or displease
    3. (intr.v.) to proceed violently, turbulently or in an agitated manner
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His remarks roiled the management of the company.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The reason the security concerns play directly onto oil prices is that they threaten supply and roil the oil markets.
    BBC, What is driving oil prices so high?, 20 April 2006
     
    demean [ dih-MEEN ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to debase or humiliate
    2. to lower the dignity of
    3. to behave or conduct oneself
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The teacher who demeaned a student for not completing his homework was dismissed by the principal.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     America's spat with Israel demeans the world's leading power, which, in its petulance is acting like a banana republic.
    The Telegraph, Barack Obama builds on George W Bush's bad mistakes, Simon Heffer, 19 March 2010.
     
    invidious [ in-VID-ee-uh' s ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. objectionable; tending to cause ill will or resentment
    2. unfair; offensively discriminating
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His propensity to make habitual invidious remarks made him extremely unpopular.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The emerging political, economic and security divides are no less invidious.
    The Times of India, LEADER ARTICLE: Bridge Global Divides, Brahma Chellaney, 28 Jan 2008
     
    poultice [ POHL-tis ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a soft, moist mass of cloth, bread, meal, herbs, etc., applied hot as a medicament to the body
    2. (n.) a moist mass of clay or other adhesive substance which is heated and spread on cloth then applied to stimulate an aching or inflamed part of the body
    3. (tr. v.) to apply a poultice to
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She used leaves and moss to prepared a poultice which she applied to his sprained ankle then bound it firmly with a strip of cloth.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Visiting a practitioner and buying a ready-prepared pill, syrup or poultice keeps us equally separate from the plants in the countryside.
    The Telegraph, Doctor in the house, Sarah Lonsdale, 2 July 2005.
     
    parlous [ PAHR-luh' s ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     risky, dangerous or perilous
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The parlous state of affairs in Africa calls for the urgent intervention of rich nations.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Many more are simply not Britain's fault; we are not to blame for the parlous economic state of many Islamic countries.
    CNN, British press fears wave of terrorism, July 1, 2007
     

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