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Thread: Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

  1. #3201
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    Post Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

    Vocabulary Flashcards | Vocabulary Test
    ineffable [ in-EF-uh'-buh' l ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. unable to describe in words; indescribable
    2. not to be spoken of or uttered; taboo
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The ineffable joy of a woman becoming a mother is well documented in the literature of almost every language.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Compact, scar-faced, blinded in one eye, he promenades around the refugee lean-tos of Biem with a lackey in tow, carrying his chair. Yet there is also an ineffable sadness about him.
    National Geographic , Shattered Sudan, Paul Salopek
     
    Tundra [ TUHN-druh', TOO'N- ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     a treeless region that falls between the icecap and tree line of the arctic regions and has an eternally frozen subsoil and sustains low-growing vegetation
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The Tundra has a harsh, cold climate.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Snow flies in your face as furry friends pull you across the isolated tundra.
    CNN, Mush! Five places to go dog sledding, By Jacque Wilson, January 13, 2009
     
    debacle [ dey-BAH-kuh' l, -BAK-uh' l, duh'- ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. sudden defeat, violent disruption or rout
    2. a fiasco or total failure
    3. the breaking up of ice in a river
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She was solely blamed for the entire debacle.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Politicians and teaching unions yesterday welcomed news that the contract with the company at the centre of this summer's national tests debacle in England has been severed.
    The Herald, Firm loses contract over exams debacle
     
    lexicographer [ lek-si-KOG-ruh'-fer ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1.(n.) a person who compiles or edits a dictionary
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     A dedicated lexicographer had compiled a dictionary containing a million words.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A common rule of thumb among lexicographers is that a word should be spotted in at least five different sources over a period of five years.
    CNN, They're looking up 'Yankspeak' for the Oxford English Dictionary, William Weir, 5 July 2000.
     
    congenial [ kuh'n-JEEN-yuh'l ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
      1. pleasing or agreeable in nature
    2. friendly or having a pleasant disposition
    3. compatible or having similar temperament
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The congenial host saw to it that all his guests were enjoying themselves.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The mood was competitive yet congenial as the dignitaries traded their suits for shorts and hit the soccer field at Chelsea Piers on a balmy New York evening April 25.
    CNN, U.N. diplomats trade suits for soccer shorts, Evan Buxbaum, 4 May 2009.
     

  2. #3202
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    Post Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

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    lampoon [ lam-POON ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) to criticize an individual or an institution through humorous writing or work of art
    2. (v.) to make the subject of a lampoon
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     To lampoon George W. Bush seemed to have been a major pastime for most American journalists during his presidency.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Many cartoonists often target politicians as subjects for their lampoons.
    Chicago Tribune, New Yorker magazine cover, Obamas, Tribune news services, July 14, 2008
     
    testy [ TES-tee ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     touchy, irritable or peevish
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His testy behaviour got on everyone's nerves.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He barely survived a confirmation vote after a testy confrontation on the torture issue.
    CNN, Attorney general dances around waterboarding issue, January 30, 2008
     
    strut [ struht  ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (intr. v.) to walk with an air of arrogance
    2. (tr. v.) to show off in an attempt to impress others
    3. (n.) the act of strutting
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The parents clapped after seeing their little girl strut about in her new dress.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The arrival of a new lion is always a very exciting event for staff and visitors, and we are looking forward to seeing Charlie strut his stuff here.
    BBC, Lion moved to join sister at zoo, 30 September 2009
     
    transpose [ v. trans-POHZ; n. TRANS-pohz ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to interchange or reverse the order of
    2. (tr. v.) to transform, transmute or transfer
    3. (intr. v.) to write or perform music in a key different from the original one
    4. (n.) a matrix formed by interchanging rows and columns
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The master of ceremonies transposed certain seat numbers as instructed and his family got to be seated at the table of honour during the banquet.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Police said the number was for a residence and they felt that the sniper had inadvertently transposed the last two digits of the telephone number.
    CNN, Police try to communicate with sniper, Jeanne Meserve and Mike Ahlers, 22 October 2002.
     
    cistern [ SIS-tern ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a reservoir, tank or receptacle for holding water or other liquid
    2. a receptacle of natural fluid of the body
    3. a tank for catching and storing rainwater
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The government planned to build a huge cistern in the catchment area to harvest rain water for the nearby village.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Lipkis and the TreePeople imagine a time when as many as a million homes and businesses have rainwater cisterns all electronically networked and ready to provide treated drinking water to the public.
    CNN, Cisterns save rainwater, quench environmental thirst, Gabe Ramirez, 13 August 2009.
     

  3. #3203
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    Post Daily Word List from TestFunda - 5 new words a day

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    solecism [ SOL-uh'-siz-uh' m, SOH-luh'- ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. something inconsistent with the normal, or accepted order
    2. a nonstandard or ungrammatical usage of language
    3. a breach of decorum or good manners
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Committing a solecism during a job interview could prove costly.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A solecism of initial blunder may generate legal heat and forensic spiral from court to court.
    The Hindu, Industrial jurisprudence, V. R. KRISHNA IYER
     
    vex [ veks ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to annoy, provoke or bother
    2. to confuse or perplex
    3. to plague, afflict or cause distress
    4. to toss about or shake
    5. to discuss in detail
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She was vexed by the situation.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     This conflict, which continues to vex the cleverest philosophers, is old and deep.
    Economist, Science and the history of colour, Nov 29th 2001
     
    vehement [ VEE-uh'-muh'nt ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. intense, powerful, deeply passionate or emotional or fervid
    2. strong, strenuous or full of vigour
    3. violent or marked by anger
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His vehement protests fell on deaf ears.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Dima Pikunov is a burly, impetuous man of vehement moods and quiet charms.
    National Geographic, Excerpts, October 2003
     
    stygian [ STIJ-ee-uh'n ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. dull and ominous
    2. pertaining to Hades or the river Styx
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The teenager was afraid to fall asleep because she was having recurring stygian nightmares.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     That mental lassitude means that when Henman steps onto the bigger stages in the game, his story is invariably shrouded in Stygian gloom.
    BBC, Henman's changing challenge, 6 January 2002
     
    imply [ im-PLAHY ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to suggest without being directly expressed or explicitly stated
    2. to signify or entail
    3. to involve as a necessary circumstance
    4. to hint at or express indirectly
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The company could not sue him for defamation of character because he did not slander them by calling them crooks though he did imply that their honesty left much to be desired.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The judiciary will imply more strict policies, and those who were arrested on Ashura Day will be confronted heavily by the judiciary
    CNN, Report: Iran releases four journalists, professor, 1 March 2010.
     

  4. #3204
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    dyspeptic [ dis-PEP-tik ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) having a gloomy, pessimistic or morose disposition
    2. (adj.) of, pertaining to or having dyspepsia or indigestion
    3. (n.) indigestion or a person suffering from indigestion or dyspepsia
    4. (n.) ill humour or disgruntlement
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His dyspeptic outlook made him blame his failures on others.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Duncan Fletcher's dyspeptic comments about Steve Harmison, Andrew Flintoff and Matthew Hoggard were further confirmation of his awkward relationship with England's bowlers.
    Telegraph, Duncan Fletcher's attack reveals his favourites, By Derek Pringle, 22 Apr 2008
     
    wrath [ rawth or, especially Amr., rath, rahth  ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. anger, fury or resentful indignation
    2. retributory punishment or vengeance
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The farmers incurred his wrath by refusing to pay the rent.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The immediate opportunity for voters to vent their wrath is at the local.
    Economist, Where there's muck..., May 12th 2009
     
    suppliant [ SUHP-lee-uh'nt ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a person who prays on behalf of another
    2. (adj.) pertaining to prayer
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The suppliant invoked God to spare the congregation from the plague.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     However, the priest, Robert Burns, may remain "if it is foreseen that the presence of the suppliant will cause no scandal".
    The Telegraph, Vatican accused of cover-up in sex abuse row, Marcus Warren, 12 December 2002
     
    thrift [ thrift ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. judicious use of money
    2. the vigorous growth of a plant
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He had to resort to thrift to take care of his family as he was not earning much.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Obama stuck to a fairly short list of priorities while invoking traditional American values of responsibility, hard work and thrift to pound home a back-to-basics message.
    CNN, Analysis: Obama takes 'morning in America' mantle, Alan Silverleib, 25 February 2009
     
    cessation [ se-SEY-shuh'n ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a discontinuance
    2. bringing to a halt or coming to an end
    3. the temporary or complete stopping
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     After the cessation of cordial relations between the two neighbouring countries, everyone feared that the next step would be open hostilities.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It requires that prisoners of war be repatriated after the cessation of hostilities,"" said May, Noriega's attorney.
    CNN, Noriega appeals to U.S. high court to avert extradition to France, Rich Phillips 18 February 2010
     

  5. #3205
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    balderdash [ BAWL-der-dash ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     nonsense; stupid, senseless talk or writing
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The Pakistan government's balderdash in the wake of the 26/11 terrorist attacks that took place in Mumbai was not surprising.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The Foreign Ministry called the State Department report an "arrogant and self-justified document" in which the U.S. "let loose a spate of balderdash" against North Korea.
    ABC News, North Korea Questions US Stance on Nuclear Issue, By KELLY OLSEN , SEOUL, South Korea May 31, 2008 (AP)
     
    consequential [ kon-si-KWEN-shuh' l ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. resultant or following an outcome or effect
    2. important or significant
    3. pompous
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was angered by the consequential outcry for his enemy's release from prison.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The current trend is consequential not only in coastal Louisiana but around the world.
    National Geographic, GeoSigns: The Big Thaw, By Daniel Glick
     
    apartheid [ uh'-PAHRT-heyt, -hahyt ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a policy that was earlier practised in the republic of south africa to separate the non-white community from the white community
    2. segregation or separation
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The practice of apartheid should be abolished.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Millions of South Africans braved autumnal weather to go to the polls in the most competitive election since the end of apartheid.
    BBC, As it happened: South Africa election, By Lucy Fleming, 22 April 2009
     
    tangential [ tan-JEN-shuh'l ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. deviating from the topic
    2. tending to be evasive
    3. irrelevant for the most part
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Instead of dealing with the problems on hand, the committee made a hue and cry about some tangential issues.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     As the politicians ordered meals of fish and chips, T-bone steaks and chicken to fuel the 12-hour session of talks, Mr Tsvangirai's advisers appeared bogged down in tangential issues that would yield little in terms of actual power.
    The Telegraph, How Zimbabwe's power sharing talks hit deadlock before 'last chance' meeting, Peta Thornycroft, 25 January 2009,
     
    chassis [ CHAS-ee, -is, SHAS-ee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the frame of a motor vehicle on which the body is supported
    2. the landing gear of an aircraft
    3. a frame for mounting the circuit components of electronic equipment
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     They observed that the body of the vehicle sustained some damage but the chassis remained intact.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It takes a while to tune your body, but I've been working on this particular chassis for eight years, so I really know what it's capable of and how to make it respond.
    CNN, Ford's wonder woman and her new car, Rex Roy, 8 May 2009.
     

  6. #3206
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    bedlam [ BED-luh' m ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     a state, place or scene of utter confusion and uproar
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The presence of a snake in the room caused absolute bedlam.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The bomb went off and it was absolute bedlam - it was the biggest bang I've ever heard in my life, he said.
    BBC News, Teacher on Saudi blast 'bedlam'
     
    genuflect [ JEN-yoo'-flekt ]
     verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to bend the knee or touch one knee to the floor in reverence or worship
    2. to show servitude; be obedient
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The arrival of the king made people genuflect.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     They genuflect toward a 17th-century painting of the Virgin Mary and baby Jesus, said to be the only flammable object to survive a major fire in 1731.
    Los Angeles Times, Zagreb, Croatia: Europe's new star, By Robert Cross, Chicago Tribune Staff Reporter, May 23, 2007
     
    aplomb [ uh'-PLOM, uh'-PLUHM ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     poise, confidence or self-assurance
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She made the presentation with aplomb.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Flash is popular because it works on any operating system and on many mobile devices, and because it handles media and graphics with aplomb.
    abcNews, How Adobe Air Apps Work, By Adam Pash, PC World, April 17, 2009
     
    torment [ v. tawr-MENT, TAWR-ment; n. TAWR-ment ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) physical or mental anguish
    2. (n.) a source of distress
    3. (tr. v.) to torture
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The sick, old man was tormented until he signed over his fortune to his son-in-law.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Miss Pilkington killed herself and her daughter who suffered from learning disabilities, after deciding she could no longer face the torment after nothing was done to help even though she made dozens of complaints to officers.
    The Telegraph, Police spend fewer than six hours a week on the streets, tom Whitehead, 2 October 2009
     
    diminution [ dim-uh'-NOO-shuh'n ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the act or process of lessening or reducing
    2. the result of a decrease
    3. the statement of a musical theme in notes of lesser duration than the original
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     After the municipality started fogging operation to control mosquitoes in the area there has been a diminution in the cases of malaria and dengue.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     But that must never be at the price of any diminution of the quality of the programmes and services we offer to our audiences.
    BBC, DIRECTOR-GENERAL FOREWORD, Mark Thompson, 18 June 2009.
     

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    conundrum [ kuh'-NUHN-druh' m ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a riddle whose answer involves a play of words or is a pun
    2. a difficult and intricate problem
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Children love the challenge of solving a conundrum.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Fans' apparent apathy toward the dark side of sports, as reflected in their continued financial support, presents a conundrum for owners and officials: If the fans are still paying to see the games, why should we take any drastic measures to try to fix it?
    ABC News, State of Sports: More Cheaters, Dopers, Criminals -- and Fans -- Than Ever Before, By JON WIENER, July 10, 2008
     
    vicissitude [ vi-SIS-i-tood, -tyood ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. variation, change or mutation
    2. alternation or a successive change
    3. an unexpected change that could occur in one's life
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The vicissitude seen in the cells alarmed the scientists.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     She can, with some justification, blame the vicissitudes of an intensely competitive market and revolutionary technology - just as Charles Allen did.
    Telegraph, Why Mirror's boss is not the next Greg Dyke, By Jeff Randall, 03 Jul 2008
     
    wreak [ reek ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to avenge or inflict or execute punishment
    2. to cause or bring about
    3. to vent, express or gratify one's emotions
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The marauding forces wreaked havoc upon everything in their path.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Breathing in polluted air may wreak havoc on our DNA, reprogramming genes in as few as three days and causing increased rates of cancer and other diseases.
    National Geographic, Pollution Can Change Your DNA in 3 Days, Study Suggests, by Ker Than, May 17, 2009
     
    summarily [ suh'-MAIR-uh'-lee ]
     adverb ]
     MEANING :
     1. without advance information
    2. in an immediate and direct manner
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     It is unconstitutional to summarily punish anyone without a fair trial.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It alleged that police in India summarily execute prisoners, torture and threaten suspects and arrest people without reason.
    CNN, India: Probe of Muslim woman's death sparks row, Harmeet Shah Singh, 12 September 2009
     
    vertebrate [ VUR-tuh'-brit ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) having a backbone or spinal column
    2. (n.) an animal that has a backbone
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     There are five different types of vertebrates grouped according to the features they possess.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The specimens, which are now being examined by scientists, could raise further tantalising clues about the ancestry of land vertebrates.
    BBC, Fossil fish in Chinese tale, 28 February 2001.
     

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    volition [ voh-LISH-uh'n, vuh'- ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an instance or act or choosing, willing or making a decision
    2. a decision or choice made according to one's own will
    3. the faculty or power to choose, make a decision or determine
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She chose to gamble her money by her own volition.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The quality of the karma that you gather is not necessarily in terms of action alone; it is also in terms of the volition with which action is performed.
    The Times of India, SPEAKING TREE, Ways to Overcome Bondage of Karma, 23 Dec 2003
     
    clairvoyant [ klair-VOI-uh' nt ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) having a perception of events and things far beyond that of a normal human being
    2. (adj.) pertaining to, of or related to clairvoyance
    3. (n.) one who is clairvoyant and claims to perceive the future
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She was termed a witch because of her clairvoyant abilities.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     We are not talking Cannes but Tenby and those in the running for prizes are not film stars but psychics, mediums and clairvoyants.
    BBC, Spiritualists gather for awards, By Nick Parry, 17 May 2008
     
    wont [ wawnt, wohnt, wuhnt ]
     noun, adjective, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) used or accustomed
    2. (adj.) apt, likely or inclined
    3. (n.) habit or custom
    4. (tr.v.) to habituate or accustom
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His wont behaviour of 'early to bed and early to rise' was regarded as the norm.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A hereditary Hindu priest, Veer Bhadra Mishra is wont, shortly after sunrise, to totter down the stone steps of his temple to the Ganges river, and there perform a three-part ritual.
    Economist, Up to their necks in it, Jul 17th 2008
     
    tamp [ tamp ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to force into or down by tapping
    2. to pack a drill hole with clay after the explosive has been inserted
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     After the explosive was set in the hole and the opening was tamped down with clay all the miners vacated the blast area.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He tamped down the tobacco with a stained finger.
    BBC, Where I Live: Nottingham, Mike Soar, 3 October 2009,
     
    arsenal [ AHR-suh'-nl, AHRS-nuh'l ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a stock of or a supply of weapons and munitions
    2. a government establishment where military equipment or munitions are manufactured
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The terrorists had access to a secret arsenal which they used to cause death and destruction.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Subjected to ignorant or malicious abuse, they are galvanised and fire off the best ammunition in their arsenal in order to counter what they see as pernicious misrepresentation.
    The Telegraph, The Conservatives must dare to defend their ideas, Janet Daley, 27 February 2010.
     

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    equine [ EE-kwahyn, EK-wahyn ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     of, related to, or resembling a horse
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     An Arab thoroughbred equine can command millions of dollars in the horse racing market.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A 15-year-old horse has died of complications from West Nile virus in Riverside County, City News Service reports, marking the first equine victim of the mosquito-borne disease in California this year.
    Los Angeles Times, Horse dies of complications of West Nile virus, June 25, 2008
     
    champ [ champ, chomp ]
     noun, intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to mash, crush, grind or bite noisily by using one's teeth
    2. (intr.v.) to use one's teeth and jaws in order to bite or munch something
    3. (n.) an act or instance of champing
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The elephant champed the sugarcane.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     We are champing at the bit to go.
    Telegraph, South Pole race starts as blizzard abates, By Stephen Adams, 05 Jan 2009
     
    ambiguous [ am-BIG-yoo-uh' s ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. open to various interpretations
    2. vague, inexplicable or uncertain
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The psychologist showed ambiguous pictures and asked some questions.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Mozart's lighter instrumental pieces are an ambiguous and varied group of works.
    The Herald, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Great Hall, Stirling Castle, ROWENA SMITH, June 10 2008
     
    subsume [ suh'b-SOOM ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to bring an idea or scheme within the field of a more comprehensive one
    2. to include in a more wide-ranging category
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The management subsumed the confectionery company into its fold by means of subterfuge.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A series of coincidences in his own life leads to the discovery of a twin brother who is plotting to kill the author and subsume his identity.
    BBC, Reel Life, 21 February 2002
     
    etymology [ et-uh'-MOL-uh'-jee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an account of the history of a particular word
    2. a derivation of the words
    3. The branch of linguistics that deals with development of words
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was studying the etymology of foreign words adopted in the English language.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He was more interested in demonstrating the etymology of words in their spelling, rather than making them easy to pronounce or spell.
    BBC, The book that influenced all others, Bob Chaundy , 15 September 2009.
     

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    complaisant [ kuh' m-PLEY-suh' nt, -zuh' nt, KOM-pluh'-zant ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     readily willing to please or oblige
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Employers are apt to take advantage of complaisant employees.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It seems that these days AMD prefers to force feed complaisant journalist geese to produce what it hopes is the finest pt de foie gras to present to its shareholders on toast.
    The INQUIRER, AMD is "out of step with Moore's Law" Analysis:*The rise and rise of the analysts, By Mike Magee: Wednesday, 26 March 2008
     
    dolt [ dohlt ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     a dunce or stupid person
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was termed a dolt.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Then there's the other character, maybe you, who made a ton of money but ended up with considerably less than the dolt down the street.
    abcNEWS, You Don't Have to Be Smart to Be Rich, By LEE DYE, May 16, 2007
     
    effusive [ i-FYOO-siv ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. extremely demonstrative, expressive or lacking restraint when showing emotions
    2. overflowing, profuse esp. pertaining to flow of lava
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His effusive demeanour angered people.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi were effusive in their praise for Somdev Devvarman, who defeated former world number one French Open champion Carlos Moya.
    The Times of India, Paes, Bhupathi heap praise on Somdev, 8 Jan 2009
     
    ambivalent [ am-BIV-uh'-luh' nt ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     exhibiting simultaneous, contradictory emotions, attitudes or feelings
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Her ambivalent reactions confused everyone.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The Russian president Dmitry Medvedev had given ambivalent indications about his country's intentions at the G8 summit in Japan earlier this week.
    Telegraph, Zimbabwe: China justifies sanctions veto, By Sebastian Berger in Johannesburg, 12 Jul 2008
     
    evocative [ ih-VOK-uh'-tiv ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. being remindful
    2. tending to arouse emotions
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     That painting of children huddled together by the hearth was evocative of a cold winter's night.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     In a scene vividly evocative of the film Flubber, Valencia gets to the byline and crosses.
    The Telegraph, Carling Cup final: Aston Villa v Manchester United as it happened, Jonathan Liew, 29 February 2010.
     

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    banal [ buh'-NAL, -NAHL, BEYN-l ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. lacking originality or novelty
    2. commonplace; petty
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Despite the presence of big stars, the banal plot of the film ensured its lukewarm response.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     In a series of leisurely-paced scenes, Suleiman shows the banal realties of petrol bomb attacks and army checkpoint searches, combining them with dreamlike sequences.
    BBC, Palestinian film shows life with conflict, Wednesday, 29 January, 2003
     
    wheedle [ HWEED-l, WEED-l ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to cajole or entice or persuade by means of flattery
    2. (tr.v.) to obtain or procure by means of flattery
    3. (intr.v.) to meet one's needs by using flattery
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He wheedled and heaped lavish praise on the President.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Jackson's lawyers have tried to paint his accuser's family as grifters with a habit of wheedling money out of the rich and famous.
    CNN, Jackson visits hospital again, June 6, 2005
     
    susceptibility [ suh'-sep-tuh'-BIL-i-tee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the tendency to be easily influenced or affected
    2. vulnerability
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His susceptibility to diseases was due to his poor physique.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Researchers believe that most cancers are triggered by a range of factors, including environmental exposure, inherited susceptibility and chance.
    The Telegraph, Genes 'could play significant role in development of leukaemia', Kate Devlin, 17 August 2009
     
    trudge [ truhj ]
     noun, intransitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (intr. v.) to walk heavily and laboriously
    2. (n.) a laborious walk
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The hikers were tired as evening drew on and they trudged wearily on their way home.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     And when the losers trudge off, beaten and vanquished, they can console themselves with the thought that they are far from alone in their abject disappointment.
    BBC, Final expectations at fever pitch, Paul Fletcher, 29 June 2008
     
    contortions [ kuh'n-TAWR-shuh'n ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. distortions or the act or process of twisting
    2. the state or position of being twisted
    3. bent out of shape
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     It was evident that he was in agony by the contortions on his face.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Thanks to a lack of flexibility, bending myself into awkward contortions is not enjoyable.
    The Telegraph, Acroyoga: fun with a very flexible friend, Olivia Walmsley, 1 March 2010.
     

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    nadir [ NEY-der, NEY-deer ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the lowest possible point; extreme despair or adversity
    2. the point on the celestial sphere directly beneath a given position or observer and diametrically opposite the zenith.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Relations between Iran and the USA reached their nadir when 66 US diplomats were taken hostage by Islamic militants in 1979.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Relations between the two parties began to quickly deteriorate, reaching their nadir on Saturday when Mayawati formally withdrew support to the UPA government.
    The Hindustan times, Congress-SP ties pushed Mayawati to pull out, Rajesh Kumar Singh, June 21, 2008
     
    wizened [ WIZ-uh'nd; WEE-zuh'nd ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     shrivelled, withered or dried up
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The wizened look did not belong on a young face.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     She looked at this wizened old man, dark and rough as a cinnamon bark.
    BBC, Meeting Munni, by Susmita Bhattacharya
     
    ale [ eyl ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a beverage like beer that is made by fermenting malt and hops with yeast
    2. an English country festival where ale is served as the primary beverage
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He preferred ale to beer.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     According to TNS, a market-research firm, the volume of real-ale sales has grown by 3% over the past year, whereas total beer sales were flat.
    Economist, Live liquid, Aug 14th 2008
     
    substantiation [ suh'b-STAN-shee-a-shuh'n  ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the establishment of facts
    2. the affirmation of an idea through action
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He is merely making wild accusations without any substantiation.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The regulator found that the Duchy Originals advert breached the code in four areas including substantiation, truthfulness and medicinal claims.
    The telegraph, Prince of Wales's Duchy Originals herbal remedy claims were 'misleading', Urmee Khan, 6 May 2009
     
    nonchalance [ NON-shuh'-lahns ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. the state or quality of being indifferent or showing a lack of concern
    2. casualness or indifference
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Shareholders were stunned at the nonchalance of the CEO regarding the huge drop in the company's profitability during the last quarter.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     And she's protectively partnered by Sarsgaard in the tricky job of playing sweet yet suspect, a balance he sustains with nonchalance.
    CNN, Review: 'An Education' showcases new It Girl, Lisa Schwarzbaum, 9 October 2009.
     

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    hackneyed [ HAK-need ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     over familiar and dull through very frequent use
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The state government's hackneyed theme of blaming the centre for all its ills did not impress the voters.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The central theme of the project is to do away with hackneyed ideas through a conscious effort.
    The Telegraph, Time to turn 2018 dream into reality, By Clive Tyldesley, 03 Nov 2007
     
    diffidence [ DIF-i-duh' ns ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     timidity, shyness or a lack of confidence
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     It was her diffidence which made everyone feel protective towards her.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Ms Merkel's diffidence arises from history: her country's and her own.
    Economist, Friends in high places, Mar 19th 2008
     
    cession [ SESH-uh' n ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an act of surrendering, yielding or giving up
    2. one or something that is given up or surrendered
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The cession by the troops stunned the General.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The commissioner Fantozzi can now proceed to the cession of the assets within the first of December
    CNN, Alitalia sale approved, From CNN's Alessio Vinci and Hada Messia, November 19, 2008
     
    apprise [ uh'-PRAHYZ ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     to inform, tell, notify or advise
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was apprised about the developing political crisis.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     ICE spokeswoman Nicole Navas said in an e-mail to the Associated Press, "We have contacted interested members of Congress to apprise them of the reinstituted removals".
    abcNEWS, Deportations to Storm-Crippled Haiti Resume, by KELLI KENNEDY, December 8, 2008
     
    jaunt [ jawnt, jahnt ]
     noun, intransitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a short pleasure trip
    2. (tr. v.) a stroll or outing
    3. (intr. v.) to undertake a short pleasure trip
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He and his friends went on a jaunt around town.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Seek out a popular dog park, make conversation with those who stop to talk on your daily neighborhood jaunts, or make pet play dates.
    CNN, Friendships: Enrich your life and improve your health, 17 April 2008.
     

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    foible [ FOI-buh' l ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a slight flaw or weakness in character
    2. the weaker portion of a blade of a sword, from its middle to its tip.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     "The decline and fall of Rome" by Edward Gibbon eloquently captures the foibles and failings of successive Roman emperors.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     He'll tell you a version of events you won't read in the official history books - one that doesn't spare the foibles and failings of the Philippines' various imperial overlords, from the Spanish to the Americans and the Japanese.
    News.com.au, Adelaide Now, Thriller in Manila for adventurous travellers, Brett Debritz, November 20, 2007
     
    whimsical [ HWIM-zi-kuh'l, WIM- ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. capricious, arbitrary or marked by whims and fanciful ideas
    2. unpredictable or erratic
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His whimsical notions were ridiculed by society.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Horton Plaza, a shopping mall with an unusual whimsical architecture, jump-started the Gaslamp Quarter renaissance in the 1980s.
    National Geographic, San Diego: Horton Plaza
     
    approbation [ ap-ruh'-BEY-shuh' n ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     approval, commendation or praise
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His approbation was necessary for the wedding to take place.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Meeting with top members of President Barack Obama's Cabinet, Biden warned that he plans to use "the moral approbation of this office" to make sure the huge fund of stimulus money is put to use creating jobs and rebuilding the nation's infrastructure.
    abcNews, Biden: Use Stimulus Money Wisely or Lose It, By STEVEN R. HURST Associated Press Writer, February 25, 2009
     
    telltale [ TEL-teyl ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) that makes known something that is not intended to be known
    2. (n.) one who shamelessly discloses personal matters
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He denied having taken any drugs, but upon close examination of his hand, the telltale prick of the needle was discernable.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Israeli police said they will issue guidelines to the public on Friday on how to spot tell-tale signs of a Palestinian suicide or car bomber.
    BBC, Israeli guidelines on spotting bombers, 30 August 2002,
     
    pallet [ PAL-it ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a straw mattress or a makeshift bed
    2. a low portable platform on which goods are placed for storage or moving
    3. a shovellike potter's tool made of wood, used for mixing and shaping clay.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     A stray dog made itself comfortable on the pallet and fell asleep.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     About 50 firefighters have been fighting a blaze at an old Ford plant in Essex where 400 sq m of wooden pallets have caught fire.
    BBC, Crews deal with large pallet fire, 16 July 2006.
     

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    extradite [ EK-struh'-dahyt ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     the surrender of a criminal or a fugitive from one country or authority to another
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Portugal's decision to extradite notorious gangster Abu Salem to India was welcomed by most people in this country.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Serbia's foreign minister says it will not extradite a Serbian student wanted in New York on assault charges.
    The New York Times, Serbia Won't Extradite Assault Suspect, By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, July 22, 2008
     
    bludgeon [ BLUHJ-uh' n ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a club that is used as a weapon and whose one side is more loaded than the other
    2. (tr.v.) to attack, hit or strike someone
    3. (tr.v.) to coerce, bully or force someone into something
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Her death was caused by a blow to the head by a bludgeon.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     I was able to clear my mind after that and the sixes at the end were very natural free-flowing shots, not trying to bludgeon the ball over the ropes. Gilchrist said
    The Times of India, Gilchrist savours sweet sixes success, 18 Nov 2007
     
    celerity [ suh'-LER-i-tee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     speed or swiftness
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The celerity achieved by the car amazed everyone.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     After raiding the firm only a week ago, they arrested Mr Horie on January 23rd with unprecedented celerity.
    Economist, Livedoor, Jan 26th 2006
     
    yore [ yawr, yohr ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     time past or long ago
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Facts of yore become fables of present.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The initial claim that the new prime minister would be "unspun", with none of the leaking and distortion of yore, soon turned out to be nonsense.
    Economist, Tailspin, Apr 16th 2009
     
    supersede [ soo-per-SEED ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to replace something inferior
    2. to set aside or displace
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The research department invented a new processor which superseded the old one.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A Lib Dem spokesman said the party's "best practice" manual had now been superseded and was "commenting on a system that no longer exists".
    The Telegraph, Lib Dems tutored MPs on how to exploit their expenses, Ed Howker, 26 September 2009
     

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    soporific [ sop-uh'-RIF-ik, soh-puh'- ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) causing or tending to cause sleep
    2. (adj.) of or pertaining to sleep or drowsiness
    3. (n.) something that causes sleep
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     For a generation brought up on a diet of T20 cricket, a test match could prove to be positively soporific.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     His lecture is titled "Meaning in American Politics," but it might have been better titled "Dreaming in American Politics," for it proves a powerful soporific.
    ABC News, Book Excerpt: 'Smashmouth' by Dana Milbank (Pt. 2), Dana Milbank, September 30, 2004
     
    bric-a-brac [ BRIK-uh'-brak ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     an assortment of small articles collected chiefly for decoration or sentimental value
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The host's sitting room was full of expensive bric-a-brac that he had assiduously collected over the years.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Need to dust that collection of glass animals or other delicate items? Put on some fabric gloves -- the softer the better -- to clean your bric-a-brac thoroughly.
    Reader's Digest, Dusting , From Extraordinary Uses for Ordinary Things
     
    dissimulate [ di-SIM-yuh'-leyt ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to conceal, disguise or hide one's true motives or feelings by using a false appearance
    2. (intr.v.) to dissemble or conceal one's true motives by means of a pretence or disguise
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He dissimulated information because he was working undercover.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Those who know not how to dissimulate, know not how to rule.
    Telegraph, We are all liars and behave worse in private than we pretend in public, By Adam Nicolson, 28 Feb 2004
     
    scarify [ SKAR-uh'-fahy ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to make superficial or shallow incisions or cuts
    2. to lacerate or criticise severely
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     While getting a tattoo, the skin has to be scarified making it a painful process.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     In the Gulf of Mexico, trawlers ply back and forth year in year out, hauling vast nets that scarify the seabed and allow no time for plant and animal life to recover.
    Economist, Troubled waters, Dec 30th 2008
     
    trough [ trawf ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. an open boxlike receptacle used chiefly to hold water or food for animals
    2. the lowest point in an economic cycle
    3. a conduit or channel for conveying water
    4. a long depression between two consecutive ridges or waves
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The horses trotted up to the trough to have a drink of water.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     ""The brewery produces about four-and-a-half gallons of waste beer and I simply pour it in the trough and the cattle drink it,"" said Mr Humphreys, who farms 200 acres at Upper Bryntalch.
    BBC, Beer and massage for Powys farmer's rare Wagyu cattle, 1 February 2010.
     

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    benign [ bi-NAHYN ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. of a mild, gentle disposition
    2. characterised by gentleness or kindness
    3. favourable
    4. harmless; non-malignant
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The benign rule of Emperor Akbar was the main reason why the Mughal empire lasted for as long as it did.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The persecution in Smyrna would, then, have taken place under that most benign of emperors, Antonius Pius, who, it is said (by Melito quoted by Eusebius), had forbidden popular attacks on Christians
    Chronicles Magazine, African Democracy, by Thomas Fleming
     
    expropriate [ eks-proh-pree-eyt ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to deprive or take away from someone his possessions or ownership rights
    2. to take something from someone else for one's own use
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The government has decided to expropriate more land in Chandipur in order to expand its missile testing base.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     An Argentine government secretary, Luis D'Ela, has lead recent efforts to expropriate Tompkins's holdings and publicly hinted that the environmentalist is working with the U.S. government to exert control over regional water supplies.
    National Geographic, "Not for Sale": S. America Natural Resources Going National, Kelly Hearn, October 31, 2006
     
    collate [ kuh'-LEYT, koh-, ko-, KOH-leyt, KOL-eyt ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to collect, arrange in an order and then examine carefully in order to integrate
    2. to appoint or admit (a cleric or clergyman) to a benefice
    3. to examine the presence of all pages before printing
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The files have to be collated before the presentation.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     If an analyst will collate all the positions to which all the candidates move, he will find himself close to the true center of national politics.
    Chronicles Magazine, The Coming Backlash, by Patrick J. Buchanan
     
    truce [ troos ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. a cease-fire
    2. a peace treaty
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Peace talks were underway and everyone hoped that the truce would be permanent.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The main armed rebel group in oil-rich southern Nigeria has said it was prolonging by 30 days its truce which expired at midnight.
    The Telegraph, Nigerian rebel group extends ceasefire, 16 September 2009
     
    harry [ HAR-ee ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to harass or annoy
    2. (tr. v.) to worry about
    3. (tr. v.) to ravage or wreak havoc on by repeated attacks
    4. (intr. v.) to make harassing incursions
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was harried by his neighbour's abusive language.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The soldiers barely managed the crossing of the Berezina River - over two frail bridges - and there were perhaps as only as few as 50,000 half-stunned survivors of the Grand Army who, harried by Cossacks, tottered on through icy temperatures towards the town.
    BBC, Napoleon's Lost Army: The Soldiers Who Fell, Paul Britten-Austin 5 November 2009.
     

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    corpulent [ KAWR-pyuh'-luh' nt ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     fat; stout; having a large bulky body
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     A corpulent frame can lead to a host of ailments, including heart disease and diabetes.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Catholics placed their own candidate, Sir John Everard, in the chair. Whereupon the Protestants placed their own candidate, the corpulent Sir John Davies, on his lap.
    BBC, A Short History of Ireland
     
    asperity [ uh'-SPER-i-tee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. ruggedness, harshness or roughness
    2. difficulty, rigor or hardship
    3. rudeness or acrimony
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The asperity of her answer stunned everyone.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The caption notes with some asperity that they thought it was closing but the information turned out to be "a stunt" by a rival party.
    BBC, Something new to say, By Mark Mardell, 5 April, 2005
     
    wrest [ rest ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to twist, jerk or force violently
    2. (tr.v.) to forcefully usurp or take away
    3. (tr.v.) to twist or distort one's meaning
    4. (n.) a twist or wrench
    5. (n.) (archaic) a small key that is used to wrench pins of a stringed instrument
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The crown and throne were wrested from him by a bloody coup.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It is not surprising that Google and 23andMe, a genomics firm, want the power of information that comes from new technologies in health care to be wrested from the medical profession.
    Economist, On MPs' expenses, Iranian dissidents, Chrysler, Nordic countries, genetic information, the Supreme Court, May 21st 2009
     
    transgress [ trans-GRES ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to break the law
    2. (tr. v.) to exceed a limit or boundary
    3. (intr. v.) to commit a sin
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The principal of the boarding school informed the students that he would severely punish anyone who dared transgress his rules.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     This internal dilemma is thrown into sharp relief when Kyle is coerced into heading up a new punishment squad to deal harshly with those who transgress the UDA's ruling on paramilitary activity.
    BBC, As the Beast Sleeps, 5 October 2009
     
    unerringly [ uhn-UR-ing-lie ]
     adverb ]
     MEANING :
     1. without making mistakes
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He unerringly did all the household chores for his mother.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     The former vice presidential candidate unerringly taps into America's conservative psyche.
    The Telegraph, The Tea Party, Sarah Palin and mutiny, Alex Spillius. 8 February 2010.
     

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    Vocabulary Flashcards | Vocabulary Test
    braggadocio [ brag-uh'-DOH-shee-oh ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. empty boasting; bragging
    2. a person who boasts; braggart
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     His braggadocio about his wealth and status irked his guests.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It's the hottest thing on television, Trump proclaimed to reporters Thursday, a bit of vintage braggadocio dating back to his meteoric rise in the '80s.
    CNN, Donald Trump is back and riding high
     
    declivity [ di-KLIV-i-tee ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     a slope or inclination showing a downward trend
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The car sped up on the declivity causing her to brake often.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Her keen eyes discern a slight darkening of the colour of the green crop in a declivity either side of it, a sign of where it would have run.
    Telegraph, Clues for landscape detectives, Jack Watkins, 03 Mar 2003
     
    vouchsafe [ vouch-SEYF ]
     intransitive verb, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr.v.) to deign or condescend to bestow favour
    2. (tr.v.) to permit or allow
    3. (intr.v.) to deign or condescend
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was out of trouble because the General vouchsafed for him.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A right that has only recently been vouchsafed, although the appeal must also be heard by a military court.
    Economist, Egypt's government battles with the Muslim Brotherhood, Apr 17th 2008
     
    trifling [ TRAHY-fling ]
     noun, adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. (adj.) having only a very little importance
    2. (adj.) of small value or quantity
    3. (n.) conduct which is frivolous
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     She started her acting career with a trifling role in a b-grade movie.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Judge Anthony Morris said: "The loss of his life over such a trifling dispute must be incomprehensible to his family."
    BBC, Drugs row killer jailed for life, 18 September 2009
     
    discombobulated [ dis-kuh'm-BOB-yuh'-ley-tid ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (tr. v.) to discompose
    2. (tr. v.) to confuse or frustrate
    3. (tr. v.) to disconcert
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     Some rowdy students at the back of the hall discombobulated the speaker by hooting during his speech.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     It's enough to make even the most conscientious climate change student issue a weary discombobulated sigh.
    CNN, Keeping track of climate change, Matthew Knight, 5 January 2009.
     

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    beatific [ bee-uh'-Tif-ik ]
     adjective ]
     MEANING :
     1. bestowing or imparting bliss or blessings
    2. having a saintly or blissful appearance
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The beatific peace one encounters in Kulu and Manali make them attractive locales for Indians and foreigners alike.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Shouted comments and piercing wolf-whistles were all welcomed with a beatific smile.
    Times Online, k. d. lang, David Sinclair at the Hammersmith Apollo
     
    cavalcade [ kav-uh' l-KEYD, KAV-uh' l-keyd ]
     noun ]
     MEANING :
     1. a procession esp. one that involves horsemen and riders
    2. a sequence, succession or series of noteworthy events or activities
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The cavalcade moved slowly as the monarch waved to the gathered crowds.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     A cavalcade of black SUVs, minivans, and chauffeured cars snaked its way up the block beside me as I ran to my son's after-school game.
    abcNews, Excerpt: 'The Manny', June 19, 2007
     
    waylay [ WEY-ley, wey-LEY ]
     transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. to lie in wait for and attack from ambush
    2. to intercept or accost unexpectedly
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     The terrorists waylaid the researcher as they tried to abduct him.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Leaving the lecture hall, Marco is waylaid by another man from that unit.
    CNN, Review: Perfect time for 'Manchurian', by Paul Clinton, July 30, 2004
     
    subpoena [ suh'-PEE-nuh' ]
     noun, verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) the court order summoning a witness to appear or for the presenting of documents in evidence
    2. (v.) the issuing of a court order
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He was served a subpoena to appear in court the following Monday.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Investigators looking into steroid use by professional baseball players obtained search warrants and subpoenas for the drug tests results on 10 major league players, but they took the results on 104 players.
    CNN, Feds seizure of baseball players' drug tests ruled illegal, Alan Duke, 27 August 2009
     
    throttle [ THROT-l ]
     noun, transitive verb ]
     MEANING :
     1. (n.) a lever for controlling or manipulating a throttle valve
    2. (n.) a valve that regulates the flow of fuel to the engine
    3. (n.) the windpipe or throat
    4. (tr. v.) to regulate the flow of fuel
    5. (tr. v.) to regulate the speed of
    6. (tr. v.) to choke or strangle
     USAGE EXAMPLE 1 :
     He enjoyed driving his new sports car at full throttle.
     USAGE EXAMPLE 2 :
     Of the 52 deaths, 41 were in cars fitted with electronic throttle controls, although Toyota has consistently denied that the problems are in any way linked to its electronic systems.
    The Telegraph, US considers device to halt 'runaway' cars, James Quinn, 3 March 2010.
     

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