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Thread: Common Errors made while writing n speaking

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    Loads of learnings !

    Anyways, there is one question in my mind.... Hope the verbal Goddess answers it !

    What is the difference between 'mistake' and 'error' ?

    As far as I remember, one of my school teachers had said that 'Errors are made by machines, Human beings make mistakes'.

    If that is so, then what should the title of this thread be?

    " Common Errors made while writing n speaking " or
    " Common Mistakes made while writing n speaking "

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    Quote Originally Posted by ameyapatkar View Post
    Loads of learnings !

    Anyways, there is one question in my mind.... Hope the verbal Goddess answers it !

    What is the difference between 'mistake' and 'error' ?

    As far as I remember, one of my school teachers had said that 'Errors are made by machines, Human beings make mistakes'.

    If that is so, then what should the title of this thread be?

    " Common Errors made while writing n speaking " or
    " Common Mistakes made while writing n speaking "
    Tried searching for the difference between the two and this is what i came across in wikipedia-

    An ‘error' is a deviation from accuracy or correctness. A ‘mistake' is an error caused by a fault: the fault being misjudgment, carelessness, or forgetfulness. Now, say that I run a stop sign because I was in a hurry, and wasn't concentrating, and the police stop me, that is a mistake. If, however, I try to park in an area with conflicting signs, and I get a ticket because I was incorrect on my interpretation of what the signs meant, that would be an error.

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    CONSCIENCE, CONSCIOUS, CONSCIOUSNESS

    Your conscience makes you feel guilty when you do bad things, but your
    consciousness is your awareness. If you are awake, you are conscious.
    Although it is possible to speak of your "conscious mind," you can't use
    "conscious" all by itself to mean "consciousness."


    CONTRARY/CONTRAST

    The phrases "on the contrary" and "to the contrary" are used to reply to
    an opposing point. Your friend tells you she is moving to New York and
    you express surprise because you thought she hated big cities. She
    replies, "On the contrary, I've always wanted to live in an urban area."

    When a distinction is being made that does not involve opposition of
    this sort, "in contrast" is appropriate. "In New York, you don't need a
    car. In Los Angeles, in contrast, you can't really get along without
    one, though you won't need a snow shovel."

    Here's a simple test: if you could possibly substitute "that's wrong"
    the phrase you want is "on the contrary" or "to the contrary." If not,
    then use "in contrast."

    CONTRASTS/CONTRASTS WITH

    "With" must not be omitted in sentences like this: "Julia's enthusiasm
    for rugby contrasts with Cheryl's devotion to chess.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess View Post
    4. "I want two Xeroxes of this card."
    The term 'Xerox' is used in North American English as a verb. Actually, 'Xerox' is the name of a company that supplies photocopiers! The correct thing to say, therefore, would be:
    "I want two photocopies of this card."


    5. "Your hairs are looking silky today."
    This is one of the most common Indian bloopers! The plural of 'hair' is 'hair'! Thus:
    "Your hair is looking silky today."


    some more::


    1. Loose vs lose:
    Many people make this mistake. They inevitably interchange the words 'loose' and 'lose' while writing. 'Lose' means to 'suffer a loss or defeat'. Thus, you would write:
    'I don't want to lose you," and not ' don't want to loose you.'

    'Loose', on the other hand, means 'not firm' or 'not fitting.' In this context, you would write,
    "My shirt is loose," not "My shirt is lose."


    2. "One of my friend lives in Kolkata."
    This is one of the most common Indian English bloopers ever! The correct way of putting that is:
    "One of my friends lives in Kolkata."

    Why? Because the sentence implies that you have many friends who live in Kolkata, but you are referring to only one of these friends.


    3. Tension-inducing tenses.
    People often use the wrong tense in their sentences. For instance, someone might say:
    "I didn't cried when I saw the movie."

    Unfortunately, the word 'didn't' is never followed by a past tense verb, in this case 'cried'. The correct way of putting it would be:
    "I didn't cry when I saw the movie."
    Not agreeing with the hair vs hairs example

    Hair if used as a countable noun, can be used in it's plural form "hairs"
    e.g. I got split hairs
    e.g. There are hairs in the comb

    You may refer for clarification :
    hair - Wiktionary
    Ask500 - What is the plural of hair? Is it hairs? But then why don't say we got a hairscut?

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    Quote Originally Posted by saurabhgotyou View Post
    Not agreeing with the hair vs hairs example

    Hair if used as a countable noun, can be used in it's plural form "hairs"
    e.g. I got split hairs
    e.g. There are hairs in the comb

    You may refer for clarification :
    hair - Wiktionary
    Ask500 - What is the plural of hair? Is it hairs? But then why don't say we got a hairscut?
    Hi Saurabh. The plural oh hair is hair and not hairs. We always say 'I got split hair' and 'There's hair in the comb'. Just to tell u..information on wiktionary and ask500people is added by people who feel sumthing is right. Any1 can go there and add information. So its quite possible that the information there is wrong. Please dont depend on those sites for correct information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by saurabhgotyou View Post
    Not agreeing with the hair vs hairs example

    Hair if used as a countable noun, can be used in it's plural form "hairs"
    e.g. I got split hairs
    e.g. There are hairs in the comb

    You may refer for clarification :
    hair - Wiktionary
    Ask500 - What is the plural of hair? Is it hairs? But then why don't say we got a hairscut?
    Quote Originally Posted by SimiNaik View Post
    Hi Saurabh. The plural oh hair is hair and not hairs. We always say 'I got split hair' and 'There's hair in the comb'. Just to tell u..information on wiktionary and ask500people is added by people who feel sumthing is right. Any1 can go there and add information. So its quite possible that the information there is wrong. Please dont depend on those sites for correct information.
    Aha! I did a bit of research on this myself, and guess what, Saurabh isn't wrong!
    It is in fact true that when the "hair" we are talking about are countable (but also again, in very specific cases) then it can very well be used as "hairs"! Eg., He brushed the dog's hairs off his jacket.
    BTW, "split hairs" is a term used which means "to make unnecessarily fine or petty distinctions" and there, the word "hairs" is only used.

    @SimiNaik: You are 100% correct in saying that the sites used for reference are not entirely reliable since anyone can edit them. Check out these links:
    hair - definition of hair by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    hairs definition | Dictionary.com

    Honestly saying, I myself couldn't believe that "hairs" is actually a word! So, this is a lesson for the day for me too. Saurabh stands true to his username "saurabhgotyou"

    Cheers to the TF spirit!

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    Quote Originally Posted by apoorv.sharma View Post
    Aha! I did a bit of research on this myself, and guess what, Saurabh isn't wrong!
    It is in fact true that when the "hair" we are talking about are countable (but also again, in very specific cases) then it can very well be used as "hairs"! Eg., He brushed the dog's hairs off his jacket.
    BTW, "split hairs" is a term used which means "to make unnecessarily fine or petty distinctions" and there, the word "hairs" is only used.

    @SimiNaik: You are 100% correct in saying that the sites used for reference are not entirely reliable since anyone can edit them. Check out these links:
    hair - definition of hair by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    hairs definition | Dictionary.com

    Honestly saying, I myself couldn't believe that "hairs" is actually a word! So, this is a lesson for the day for me too

    Cheers to the TF spirit!
    Hey the use of "hairs" is an example of Americanism. It's American English only. British English is what is used in CAT and other MBA entrnce exams. So, th use of "hairs" is incorrect!!

    Btw, All the dictionary sites are AMERICAN sites. So, they prefer American English. Check out the Oxford Dictionary if need be. :P

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess View Post
    Hey the use of "hairs" is an example of Americanism. It's American English only. British English is what is used in CAT and other MBA entrnce exams. So, th use of "hairs" is incorrect!!

    Btw, All the dictionary sites are AMERICAN sites. So, the prefer American English. Check out the Oxford Dictionary if need be. :P
    oh! The classic American-Brit spelling difference. No need to cross check the dictionary. I'll take your word for it Thanks for pointing it out Princess!

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    Quote Originally Posted by apoorv.sharma View Post
    oh! The classic American-Brit spelling difference. No need to cross check the dictionary. I'll take your word for it Thanks for pointing it out Princess!
    Anytime, dude!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess View Post
    Hey the use of "hairs" is an example of Americanism. It's American English only. British English is what is used in CAT and other MBA entrnce exams. So, th use of "hairs" is incorrect!!

    Btw, All the dictionary sites are AMERICAN sites. So, they prefer American English. Check out the Oxford Dictionary if need be. :P
    Exactly! I think u are right. Americans have spoilt the language. And many a times we use their version of english without knowing it.

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    Try out the "RC Passage a Day"

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShipraKaushik View Post
    Exactly! I think u are right. Americans have spoilt the language. And many a times we use their version of english without knowing it.
    Many a time, another blooper !!!!! Right princess ??????

    Well, my query on 'Error' vs 'Mistake' remains unanswered by (the) princess.... Help please !

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess View Post
    Some people pluralize proper nouns, eg. "The Bill Gateses and the Julia Robertses of the world"
    Proper nouns DON'T have plurals..

    here's another one..
    1. "It was a blunder mistake."

    The word 'blunder' itself means mistake, so you could say:
    "It was a blunder," or
    "It was a big mistake."
    but cant we use plural surname to denote the family as a whole like "jacksons"

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    Default a doubt

    what is the difference between the following sentences and which one is the correct one??
    1.he lost not only his ticket but also his luggage
    2.he not only lost his ticket but also his luggage

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess View Post
    "It would have been more better."
    The word 'better' itself implies that the option in question is superior -- the use of the word 'more' in the sentence is, therefore both inappropriate and unnecessary. Thus the correct sentence would go as follows:
    "It would have been better."
    Sorry for the late reply but is much better allowed as in "I feel much better now " .

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    princess why have u stopped posting. pls keep on posting

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    Quote Originally Posted by viral412tiger View Post
    what is the difference between the following sentences and which one is the correct one??
    1.he lost not only his ticket but also his luggage
    2.he not only lost his ticket but also his luggage
    Both are perfectly fine..

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    COPE UP/COPE WITH

    When you can't keep up with your work you may not be able to cope with
    your job; but you never "cope up" with anything. In casual speech we say
    "I can't cope," but in formal writing "cope" is normally followed by
    "with."

    COPYWRITE/COPYRIGHT

    You can copyright writing, but you can also copyright a photograph or
    song. The word has to do with securing rights. Thus, there is no such
    word as "copywritten"; it's "copyrighted."

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess View Post
    COPE UP/COPE WITH

    When you can't keep up with your work you may not be able to cope with
    your job; but you never "cope up" with anything. In casual speech we say
    "I can't cope," but in formal writing "cope" is normally followed by
    "with."

    COPYWRITE/COPYRIGHT

    You can copyright writing, but you can also copyright a photograph or
    song. The word has to do with securing rights. Thus, there is no such
    word as "copywritten"; it's "copyrighted."
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    COSTUMER/CUSTOMER

    Just what would a "costumer service" do? Supply extra-shiny spangles for
    a Broadway diva's outfit? But this phrase is almost always a
    typographical error for "customer service," and it appears on an
    enormous number of Web pages. Be careful not to swap the U and O when
    you type "customer."

    COULD CARE LESS/COULDN'T CARE LESS

    Cliches are especially prone to scrambling because they become
    meaningless through overuse. In this case an expression which originally
    meant "it would be impossible for me to care less than I do because I do
    not care at all" is rendered senseless by being transformed into the
    now-common "I could care less." Think about it: if you could care less,
    that means you care some. The original already drips sarcasm, so it's
    pointless to argue that the newer version is "ironic." People who misuse
    this phrase are just being careless.

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