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Thread: Common Errors made while writing n speaking

  1. #41
    Aficionado kishan235's Avatar
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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    UNINTERESTED vs DISINTERESTED

    UNINTERESTED is used when the person is lacking interest in someone or somebody. Whereas,

    DISINTERESTED is used when we are free from bias and self-interest.

    We should be conscious while using the two words.
    edited by kishan235 on 10/25/2008

  2. #42
    Virtuoso PRIncess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    hey guys, is there any difference between condole and console?
    are solace and soothe synonyms of these two?
    or any comment on the uses of these four words?
    please help me, i m confused with the uses of these four.
    thanks.
    da 4 words are kinda similar.. console and condole are used for the same thing except that u console sun1 and u condole 'wid' sum1..

    solace is something dat u find and soothing can be done wen u're hurt in some way.. soothing and solace are kinda milder words.. condole and console are used for very serious probz..
    edited by PRIncess on 10/25/2008

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess
    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    hey guys, is there any difference between condole and console?
    are solace and soothe synonyms of these two?
    or any comment on the uses of these four words?
    please help me, i m confused with the uses of these four.
    thanks.
    da 4 words are kinda similar.. console and condole are used for the same thing except that u console sun1 and u condole 'wid' sum1..

    solace is something dat u find and soothing can be done wen u're hurt in some way.. soothing and solace are kinda milder words.. condole and console are used for very serious probz..
    edited by PRIncess on 10/25/2008
    hey are u sure,this condole can't be used without with?
    i mean, can't u condole someone?
    and can u give me an example of the use of soothe?
    and we can use all these words as synonyms for each other na?

  4. #44
    Virtuoso PRIncess's Avatar
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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    wat's the difference between the uses of mobile and movable?
    and between those of money and monies,
    complete and replete,
    barefoot and barefooted?
    edited by pranav_ravani on 10/24/2008
    mobile and movable mean da same.. except dat u cant call a cell fone a movable fone.. it's mobile.. mobile is referred to things that can move by themselves.. like a child becomes mobile not movable..

    complete n replete are da same...

    again, barefooted n barefoot mean da same.. u can use either wenever u want

  5. #45
    Virtuoso PRIncess's Avatar
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    U know wat.. U r rite.. I just checked again n u can also condole sum1.. but u cannot console with some1 (unless 2 ppl are consoling a third person).. Yea.. use condole n console as synonyms but dont use soothe n solace.. solace is usually found in some1..

    usage for soothe:

    When music fails to agree to the ear, to soothe the ear and the heart and the senses, then it had missed the point. Maria Callas.

  6. #46
    Virtuoso pranav_ravani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess
    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    wat's the difference between the uses of mobile and movable?
    and between those of money and monies,
    complete and replete,
    barefoot and barefooted?
    edited by pranav_ravani on 10/24/2008
    mobile and movable mean da same.. except dat u cant call a cell fone a movable fone.. it's mobile.. mobile is referred to things that can move by themselves.. like a child becomes mobile not movable..

    complete n replete are da same...

    again, barefooted n barefoot mean da same.. u can use either wenever u want
    hey,then give me answers for these..

    1.) His novel is complete/replete with humor that would make a sailor blush.
    2.) We need more barefoot/barefooted counsellors to help the rural poor with their emotional difficulties.

  7. #47
    Invisible aaamresh's Avatar
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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess
    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    wat's the difference between the uses of mobile and movable?
    and between those of money and monies,
    complete and replete,
    barefoot and barefooted?
    edited by pranav_ravani on 10/24/2008
    mobile and movable mean da same.. except dat u cant call a cell fone a movable fone.. it's mobile.. mobile is referred to things that can move by themselves.. like a child becomes mobile not movable..

    complete n replete are da same...

    again, barefooted n barefoot mean da same.. u can use either wenever u want
    hey,then give me answers for these..

    1.) His novel is complete/replete with humor that would make a sailor blush.
    2.) We need more barefoot/barefooted counsellors to help the rural poor with their emotional difficulties.

    one of the roots of "replete" is the Latin verb "pl?re," meaning "to fill," it isn't surprising that the word has synonyms such as "full" and "complete." "Replete," "full," and "complete" all indicate that something contains all that is wanted or needed or possible, but there are also subtle differences between the words. "Full" implies the presence or inclusion of everything that can be held, contained, or attained ("a full schedule"), while "complete" applies when all that is needed is present ("a complete picture of the situation"). "Replete" is the synonym of choice when fullness is accompanied by a sense of satiety.

    barefoot adv. and adj.
    barefooted adj. only (not so commonly used)

    so for me ...........
    1) complete
    2) barefoot

    am i right pranav?
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  8. #48
    Virtuoso pranav_ravani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaamresh
    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess
    Quote Originally Posted by pranav_ravani
    wat's the difference between the uses of mobile and movable?
    and between those of money and monies,
    complete and replete,
    barefoot and barefooted?
    edited by pranav_ravani on 10/24/2008
    mobile and movable mean da same.. except dat u cant call a cell fone a movable fone.. it's mobile.. mobile is referred to things that can move by themselves.. like a child becomes mobile not movable..

    complete n replete are da same...

    again, barefooted n barefoot mean da same.. u can use either wenever u want
    hey,then give me answers for these..

    1.) His novel is complete/replete with humor that would make a sailor blush.
    2.) We need more barefoot/barefooted counsellors to help the rural poor with their emotional difficulties.

    one of the roots of "replete" is the Latin verb "pl?re," meaning "to fill," it isn't surprising that the word has synonyms such as "full" and "complete." "Replete," "full," and "complete" all indicate that something contains all that is wanted or needed or possible, but there are also subtle differences between the words. "Full" implies the presence or inclusion of everything that can be held, contained, or attained ("a full schedule"), while "complete" applies when all that is needed is present ("a complete picture of the situation"). "Replete" is the synonym of choice when fullness is accompanied by a sense of satiety.

    barefoot adv. and adj.
    barefooted adj. only (not so commonly used)

    so for me ...........
    1) complete
    2) barefoot

    am i right pranav?
    bro,m actually confused with these words,that's y asked here...
    anyways,i have the solution..according to it,
    1.) replete
    2.) barefoot

    according to the solution that i have, complete means having all parts and replete means be full of..the novel is full of humor...that's why it's replete...
    and barefoot and barefooted both have the same meaning in the literal sense. But metaphorically barefoot means with the basic or minimum requirements,which is the meaning intended here..

    and personally speaking, your explanation leads me to replete only..
    any comments amr and princess?

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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    Interesting discussion....nad kudos to princess for keeping the english usage flame burning. I also quite liked the daily questions on testfunda on english usage--crumby and crummy ones. This question i feel pranav's solution is cool. Dunno why bit it just feels right...barefoot and replete. I guess these questions are looking at our usage rather than vocabulary skills and trust me i am struggling at it big time. just hope CAT and none of the other exams harp on it too much. princess and pranav... and all the others...please keep the discussion on..really benifitting onlookers like me.

  10. #50
    Virtuoso pranav_ravani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by no.pun.intended
    Interesting discussion....nad kudos to princess for keeping the english usage flame burning. I also quite liked the daily questions on testfunda on english usage--crumby and crummy ones. This question i feel pranav's solution is cool. Dunno why bit it just feels right...barefoot and replete. I guess these questions are looking at our usage rather than vocabulary skills and trust me i am struggling at it big time. just hope CAT and none of the other exams harp on it too much. princess and pranav... and all the others...please keep the discussion on..really benifitting onlookers like me.
    hey bro,thanks a lot..
    but as u only said it's not merely about vocab..pleaseeeeeeee post some questions regarding this whenever u encounter with some of such questions...
    then better we discuss how to solve them,rather than just reading the homonyms..

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    can anyone tell whether d sentence is correct


    " i want to talk to you"

    will "to/with" be used
    edited by annabhai12 on 10/30/2008

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by annabhai12
    can anyone tell whether d sentence is correct


    " i want to talk to you"

    will "to/with" be used
    edited by annabhai12 on 10/30/2008
    I guess when you refer to someone who is junior/ equal in rank, you 'talk to' (it also has the connotation of 'talking down to/ other person is expected to speak minimal' etc.

    When you want to converse with someone or you refer to someone of equal or higher rank you 'talk with'. It has a conversational meaning where both are expected to contribute equally to the discussion. What say princess and pranav?

  13. #53
    Virtuoso pranav_ravani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by no.pun.intended
    Quote Originally Posted by annabhai12
    can anyone tell whether d sentence is correct


    " i want to talk to you"

    will "to/with" be used
    edited by annabhai12 on 10/30/2008
    I guess when you refer to someone who is junior/ equal in rank, you 'talk to' (it also has the connotation of 'talking down to/ other person is expected to speak minimal' etc.

    When you want to converse with someone or you refer to someone of equal or higher rank you 'talk with'. It has a conversational meaning where both are expected to contribute equally to the discussion. What say princess and pranav?
    well i haven't heard about this bro,honestly speaking..
    but ya,i worked in an international call center once,there we used to ask if we can speak with Mr. XYZ.
    so i guess,it should be talk to or speak with..
    wat say guys?

  14. #54
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    I agree wid Pranav.. "talk to" and "speak with" are the correct ways to speak n write.. When u say talk with, it's not exactly incorrect but it isnt used in that way.. It just doesnt sound right..U can say speak to, though..

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess
    I agree wid Pranav.. "talk to" and "speak with" are the correct ways to speak n write.. When u say talk with, it's not exactly incorrect but it isnt used in that way.. It just doesnt sound right..U can say speak to, though..
    thanks princess..
    even i think that we can use speak to..but should prefer speak with..

  16. #56
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    BAIL/BALE

    You bail the boat and bale the hay.

    In the expression "bail out" meaning to abandon a position or situation,
    it is nonstandard in America to use "bale," though that spelling is
    widely accepted in the UK. The metaphor in the US is to compare
    oneself when jumping out of a plane to a bucket of water being tossed
    out of a boat, though that is probably not the origin of the phrase.

    BALDFACED, BOLDFACED/BAREFACED

    The only one of these spellings recognized by the Oxford English
    Dictionary as meaning "shameless" is "barefaced." Etymologies often
    refer to the prevalence of beards among Renaissance Englishmen, but
    beards were probably too common to be considered as deceptively
    concealing. It seems more likely that the term derived from the
    widespread custom at that time among the upper classes of wearing masks
    to social occasions where one would rather not be recognized.

    BALL, BAWL

    To "bawl" is to cry out loudly, so when you break down in tears you bawl
    like a baby and when you reprimand people severely you bawl them out.
    Don't use "ball" in these sorts of expressions. It has a number of
    meanings, but none of them have to do with shouting and wailing unless
    you're shouting "play ball!"

    BARB WIRE, BOB WIRE/BARBED WIRE

    In some parts of the country this prickly stuff is commonly called "barb
    wire" or even "bob wire." When writing for a general audience, stick
    with the standard "barbed wire."

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    BARE/BEAR

    There are actually three words here. The simple one is the big growly
    creature (unless you prefer the Winnie-the-Pooh type). Hardly anyone
    past the age of ten gets that one wrong. The problem is the other two.
    Stevedores bear burdens on their backs and mothers bear children. Both
    mean "carry" (in the case of mothers, the meaning has been extended from
    carrying the child during pregnancy to actually giving birth). But
    strippers bare their bodies--sometimes bare-naked. The confusion between
    this latter verb and "bear" creates many unintentionally amusing
    sentences; so if you want to entertain your readers while convincing
    them that you are a dolt, by all means mix them up. "Bear with me," the
    standard expression, is a request for forbearance or patience. "Bare
    with me" would be an invitation to undress. "Bare" has an adjectival
    form: "The pioneers stripped the forest bare."

    BASED AROUND, BASED OFF OF/BASED ON

    You can build a structure around a center; but bases go on the bottom of
    things, so you can't base something around something else.

    Similarly, you can build something off of a starting point, but you
    can't base anything off of anything. Something is always based on
    something else.

    BASISES/BASES

    The plural of "basis" is "bases," pronounced "BAY-sees" (not to be
    confused with Baywatch).

    BASICLY/BASICALLY

    There are "-ly" words and "-ally" words, and you basically just have to
    memorize which is which. But "basically" is very much overused and is
    often better avoided in favor of such expressions as "essentially,"
    "fundamentally," or "at heart."

    BAITED BREATH/BATED BREATH

    Although the odor of the chocolate truffle you just ate may be
    irresistible bait to your beloved, the proper expression is "bated
    breath." "Bated" here means "held, abated." You do something with bated
    breath when you're so tense you're holding your breath.

  18. #58
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    BARTER/HAGGLE

    When you offer to trade your vintage jeans for a handwoven shirt in
    Guatemala, you are engaged in barter--no money is involved. One thing (or
    service) is traded for another.

    But when you offer to buy that shirt for less money than the vendor is
    asking, you are engaged in haggling or bargaining, not bartering.

    BAZAAR/BIZARRE

    A "bazaar" is a market where miscellaneous goods are sold. "Bizarre," in
    contrast, is an adjective meaning "strange," "weird."

    BEAUROCRACY/BUREAUCRACY

    The French bureaucrats from whom we get this word worked at their
    bureaus (desks, spelled "bureaux" in French) in what came to be known as
    bureaucracies.

    BEAT/BEAD

    In American English when you focus narrowly on something or define it
    carefully you "get a bead" or "draw a bead" on it. In this expression
    the term "bead" comes from the former name for the little metal bump on
    the end of a gun barrel which helped the shooter aim precisely at a
    target. "Beat" is often mistakenly substituted for "bead" by people who
    imagine that the expression has something to do with matching the timing
    of the person or activity being observed, catching up with it.

    BECKON CALL/BECK AND CALL

    This is a fine example of what linguists call "popular etymology."
    People don't understand the origins of a word or expression and make one
    up based on what seems logical to them. "Beck" is just an old shortened
    version of "beckon." If you are at people's beck and call it means they
    can summon you whenever they want: either by gesture (beck) or speech
    (call).

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    Hey Princess can you explain the difference between revenge and avenge in more detail??
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    Quote Originally Posted by sumit2goody
    Hey Princess can you explain the difference between revenge and avenge in more detail??
    revenge- noun
    avenge- verb

    The noun "revenge" can be used in various phrases to make a verb:

    To take revenge on
    To exact revenge on

    He took revenge on the man who killed his brother

    It can also be used as an adjective:

    Police said that the murder of the gang member was a revenge killing.

    To avenge is simply a verb (to take revenge because of something)

    Fabius Maximus vowed to avenge his sister and kill the men who murdered her.

    If you were to use "revenge" you would have to say:

    Fabius Maximus vowed to take revenge and kill the men who murdered his sister.

    So, To avenge [verb] = To take [verb] revenge [noun] because of something/on account of something.
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