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Thread: Common Errors made while writing n speaking

  1. #81
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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    BORROW/LOAN

    In some dialects it is common to substitute "borrow" for "loan" or
    "lend," as in "borrow me that hammer of yours, will you, Jeb?" In
    standard English the person providing an item can loan it; but the
    person receiving it borrows it.


    BORROW OFF/BORROW FROM

    In some dialects you can borrow five dollars off a friend; but in
    standard English you borrow the money from a friend.

    BOTH/EACH

    There are times when it is important to use "each" instead of "both."
    Few people will be confused if you say "I gave both of the boys a
    baseball glove," meaning "I gave both of the boys baseball gloves"
    because it is unlikely that two boys would be expected to share one
    glove; but you risk confusion if you say "I gave both of the boys $50."
    It is possible to construe this sentence as meaning that the boys shared
    the same $50 gift. "I gave each of the boys $50" is clearer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ASINGH07
    Hi Princess,
    i m new joinee here.You have written on page 1st 'Why doesn't he get married?' Don't u think it is wrong .The right way is 'Why does he not get marry?'
    Well no.. "Why does he not get marry?" is grammatically incorrect.. It can either be 'Why doesn't he get married?' or 'Why does he not get married?'

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    Quote Originally Posted by tusharsem
    Hi

    I have a question here....What of the following is the correct way of saying 'Hi' ??

    Is it 'Hi' OR 'Hi,' ??

    and also while ending the mail

    Is it 'Regards' OR 'Regards,' ??

    i.e. do we have to include a comma at the end or not ??

    Thanks
    If u wanna specify a name at the end of the 'hi' it'll be "hi name," else juzz "hi," (This is case of a letter). For general oral conversations itz "Hi."

    And at the end of a mail, itz always "Regards," and under it specify your own name (and designation, if applicable)

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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    These are really helpful man. Do post more n more examples.

    thanks a lot...

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    BOUGHTEN/BOUGHT

    "Bought, " not "boughten" is the past tense of "buy." "Store-bought," a
    colloquial expression for "not home-made," is already not formal
    English; but it is not improved by being turned into "store-boughten."

    BOUNCE/BOUNDS

    A leaky ball may be out of bounce, but when it crosses the boundary line
    off the basketball court or football field it goes out of bounds.
    Similarly, any action or speech that goes beyond proper limits can be
    called "out of bounds": "Mark thought that it was out of bounds for his
    wife to go spelunking with Tristan, her old boyfriend."

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    BOURGEOIS

    In the original French, a bourgeois was originally merely a free
    inhabitant of a "bourg," or town. Through a natural evolution it became
    the label for members of the property-owning class, then of the middle
    class. As an adjective it is used with contempt by bohemians and
    Marxists to label conservatives whose views are not sufficiently
    revolutionary. The class made up of bourgeois (which is both the
    singular and the plural form) is the bourgeoisie. Shaky spellers are
    prone to leave out the "E" from the middle because "eoi" is not a
    natural combination in English; but these words have remarkably enough
    retained their French pronunciation: boorzhwah and boorzhwazee. The
    feminine form, "bourgeoise," is rarely encountered in English.

    BOUYANT/BUOYANT

    Buoys are buoyant. In the older pronunciation of "buoyant" as "bwoyant"
    this unusual spelling made more sense. Now that the pronunciation has
    shifted to "boyant" we have to keep reminding ourselves that the U comes
    before the O. The root noun, however, though often pronounced "boy" is
    more traditionally pronounced "BOO-ee."

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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
    can u pls give me the list of commonly misspelt words........


    thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by NIKHILKUNDU
    hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
    can u pls give me the list of commonly misspelt words........


    thanks
    Hiii.. will try.. It'll be difficult to find such a list, though.. but the idea sure is interesting

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    BRAINCHILD

    Some people misuse "brainchild," as in "Steve Jobs is the brainchild
    behind the iPhone." A brainchild is not a person, but the child
    (product) of someone's brain. So the iPhone is the brainchild of Steve
    Jobs.

    BRAND NAMES

    Popular usage frequently converts brand names into generic ones, with
    the generic name falling into disuse. Few people call gelatin dessert
    mix anything other than "Jell-O," which helps to explain why it's hard
    to find Nabisco's Royal Gelatin on the grocery shelves. All facial
    tissues are "Kleenex" to the masses, all photocopies "Xeroxes." Such
    commercial fame is, however, a two-edged sword: sales may be lost as
    well as gained from such over-familiarity. Few people care whether their
    "Frisbee" is the genuine Wham-O brand original or an imitation. Some of
    these terms lack staying power: "Hoover" used to be synonymous with
    "vacuum cleaner," and the brand name was even transmuted into a verb:
    "to hoover" (these uses are still common in the UK). Most of the time
    this sort of thing is fairly harmless, but if you are a motel operator
    offering a different brand of whirlpool bath in your rooms, better not
    call it a "Jacuzzi."

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    Hey guys, by Public Demand am starting a new thread.. "Popularly Missspelled words" .. Plz contribute to it if u can..

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    BRANG, BRUNG/BROUGHT

    In some dialects the past tense of "bring" is "brang" and "brung" is the
    past participle; but in standard English both are "brought."

    BREACH/BREECH

    Substitute a K for the CH in "breach" to remind you that the word has to
    do with breakage: you can breach (break through) a dam or breach
    (violate the terms of) a contract. As a noun, a breach is something
    broken off or open, as in a breach in a military line during combat.

    "Breech" however, refers to rear ends, as in "breeches" (slang spelling
    "britches"). Thus "breech cloth," "breech birth," or "breech-loading
    gun."

    "Once more unto the breach, dear friends," means "let's charge into the
    gap in the enemy's defenses," not "let's reach into our pants again."

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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    Hi Princess,

    Must say you are doing a nice job. Well u mentioned in one of your posts that it is 'Photocopy' and not 'Xerox'. But I guess that by now Xerox has become synonymous with photocopy. And yes the most common mistake that I come across is people using 'THE' in the most inappropriate places like 'The Gandhiji'.

    Another mistake is people introducing themselves as 'Myself so and so' whereas I think the proper usage would be ' I am so and so'

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    Hi Shipra,

    I agree with you. The mistakes that you mentioned are very common. I have heard those during our presentations at college. Sometimes it looks like sum people place certain favourite whereever they feel like and a bit too often. But I guess one can get over it with regularly speaking in english and getting sum1 to correct them when they go wrong.

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    BRAKE/BREAK

    You brake to slow down; if your brakes fail and you drive through a
    plate-glass window, you will break it.

    BREATH/BREATHE

    When you need to breathe, you take a breath. "Breathe" is the verb,
    "breath" the noun.

    BRING/TAKE

    When you are viewing the movement of something from the point of
    arrival, use "bring": "When you come to the potluck, please bring a
    green salad." Viewing things from the point of departure, you should use
    "take": "When you go to the potluck, take a bottle of wine."

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    BRITAIN/BRITON

    A British person is a Briton; only the country can be referred to as
    "Britain."

    BRITISH/ENGLISH

    Americans tend to use the terms "British" and "English" interchangeably,
    but Great Britain is made up of England plus Scotland and Wales. If you
    are referring to this larger entity, the word you want is "British."
    Britons not from England resent being referred to as "English."


    BROACH/BROOCH

    A decorative pin is a "brooch" even though it sounds like "broach"--a
    quite different word. Although some dictionaries now accept the latter
    spelling for jewelry, you risk looking ignorant to many readers if you
    use it.

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    Another mistake i have heard is the usage of 'to'. People say are u cumin college instead of 'are u cumin TO college' and they say 'please call TO him' instead of 'please call him'.

    Princess can u enlighten me on how to make ppl understand abt the proper usage of the word 'TO'?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vibhs View Post
    Another mistake i have heard is the usage of 'to'. People say are u cumin college instead of 'are u cumin TO college' and they say 'please call TO him' instead of 'please call him'.

    Princess can u enlighten me on how to make ppl understand abt the proper usage of the word 'TO'?
    To is used with a verb to make it an infinitive. For eg, U can say "to call" as call is a verb.

    If u wanna wanna indicate the exchange of sumthing (things, thoughts, ideas, etc.) between two ppl, u can use "to". For eg, "It was meant to be given TO him."

    U cant say "Call TO him" as neither is "him" a verb nor are u exchanging "call" with him.

    Hope this helps.

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    BROKE/BROKEN

    When you break something, it's broken, not "broke," though a person or
    organization which has run out of money can be said in informal speech
    to be "broke." Otherwise, use "broke" only as the simple past tense of
    "break," without a helping verb: "Azfar broke the record," but "The
    record was broken by Azfar."

    BOUGHT/BROUGHT

    If you pay for something, you've bought it; if you bring something
    you've brought it. These two words are probably interchanged most often
    out of mere carelessness. A spelling checker won't catch the switch, so
    watch out for it.

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    BLUNT/BRUNT

    Some people mistakenly substitute the adjective "blunt" for the noun
    "brunt" in standard expressions like "bear the brunt." "Brunt" means
    "main force."

    BRUNT/BUTT

    A person who is the target of jokers is the butt of their humor (from an
    old meaning of the word "butt": target for shooting at). But the object
    of this joking has to bear the brunt of the mockery (from an old word
    meaning a sharp blow or attack). A person is never a brunt. The person
    being attacked receives the brunt of it.

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    BRUSSEL SPROUT/BRUSSELS SPROUT

    These tiny cabbage-like vegetables are named after the Belgian city of
    Brussels, which has an "S" on the end. The correct spelling is "Brussels
    sprout."

    BUILD OFF OF/BUILD ON

    You build "on" your earlier achievements, you don't build "off of" them.

    BULLION/BOUILLON

    Gold bricks are bullion. Boil down meat stock to get bouillon. It's an
    expensive mistake to confuse bullion with bouillon in a recipe.

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