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Thread: Common Errors made while writing n speaking

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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    Hi Friends let's avoid all possible errors in wriiten n spoken english.. I'll be adding to this thread daily.. U'll also can contribute to it..
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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    Some people pluralize proper nouns, eg. "The Bill Gateses and the Julia Robertses of the world"
    Proper nouns DON'T have plurals..

    here's another one..
    1. "It was a blunder mistake."

    The word 'blunder' itself means mistake, so you could say:
    "It was a blunder," or
    "It was a big mistake."

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    "It would have been more better."
    The word 'better' itself implies that the option in question is superior -- the use of the word 'more' in the sentence is, therefore both inappropriate and unnecessary. Thus the correct sentence would go as follows:
    "It would have been better."

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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    "He don’t care about me anymore."
    This is INCORRECT.

    Doesn't, does not, or does are used with the third person singular - words like he, she, and it.

    Don't, do not, or do are used for other subjects.

    This is correct: "He doesn’t care about me anymore."

    "When we go to the party on Saturday, let’s bring a bottle of wine."
    This is INCORRECT.

    When you are viewing the movement of something from the point of arrival, use “bring”:

    * "When you come to the party, please bring a bottle of wine."

    This is CORRECT.

    When you are viewing the movement of something from the point of departure, use “take”:

    * "When we go to the party, let’s take a bottle of wine."

    This is CORRECT.
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    4. "I want two Xeroxes of this card."
    The term 'Xerox' is used in North American English as a verb. Actually, 'Xerox' is the name of a company that supplies photocopiers! The correct thing to say, therefore, would be:
    "I want two photocopies of this card."


    5. "Your hairs are looking silky today."
    This is one of the most common Indian bloopers! The plural of 'hair' is 'hair'! Thus:
    "Your hair is looking silky today."


    some more::


    1. Loose vs lose:
    Many people make this mistake. They inevitably interchange the words 'loose' and 'lose' while writing. 'Lose' means to 'suffer a loss or defeat'. Thus, you would write:
    'I don't want to lose you," and not ' don't want to loose you.'

    'Loose', on the other hand, means 'not firm' or 'not fitting.' In this context, you would write,
    "My shirt is loose," not "My shirt is lose."


    2. "One of my friend lives in Kolkata."
    This is one of the most common Indian English bloopers ever! The correct way of putting that is:
    "One of my friends lives in Kolkata."

    Why? Because the sentence implies that you have many friends who live in Kolkata, but you are referring to only one of these friends.


    3. Tension-inducing tenses.
    People often use the wrong tense in their sentences. For instance, someone might say:
    "I didn't cried when I saw the movie."

    Unfortunately, the word 'didn't' is never followed by a past tense verb, in this case 'cried'. The correct way of putting it would be:
    "I didn't cry when I saw the movie."

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    1. "Why don't he get married?"

    The term 'don't' applies when discussing a plural subject. For instance, "Why don't they get married?" The right way to phrase that sentence would be:

    "Why doesn't he get married?"

    360 DEGREES/180 DEGREES

    When you turn 360 degrees you've completed a circle and are back where
    you started. So if you want to describe a position that's diametrically
    opposed to another, the expression you want is not "360 degrees away"
    but "180 degrees away."

    f the word following begins with a vowel sound, the word you want is
    "an": "Have an apple, Adam." If the word following begins with a
    consonant, but begins with a vowel sound, you still need "an": "An X-ray
    will show whether there's a worm in it." It is nonstandard and often
    considered sloppy speech to utter an "uh" sound in such cases.

    When the following word definitely begins with a consonant sound, you
    need "a": "A snake told me apples enhance mental abilities."

    See also "an historic."

    A.D.

    "A.D." does not mean "after death," as many people suppose. "B.C."
    stands for the English phrase "before Christ," but "A.D." stands
    confusingly for a Latin phrase: anno domini ("in the year of the
    Lord"--the year Jesus was born). If the calendar actually changed with
    Jesus' death, then what would we do with the years during which he
    lived? Since Jesus was probably actually born around 6 B.C. or so, the
    connection of the calendar with him can be misleading.

    Many Biblical scholars and historians, and archeologists prefer the less
    sectarian designations "before the Common Era" (B.C.E.) and "the Common
    Era" (C.E.).

    All of these abbreviations can also be spelled without their periods.

    AM/PM

    "AM" stands for the Latin phrase "Ante Meridiem"--which means "before
    noon"--and "PM" stands for "Post Meridiem": "after noon." Although
    digital clocks routinely label noon "12:00 PM" you should avoid this
    expression not only because it is incorrect, but because many people
    will imagine you are talking about midnight instead. The same goes for
    "12:00 AM." Just say or write "noon" or "midnight" when you mean those
    precise times.

    It is now rare to see periods placed after these abbreviations: "A.M.",
    but in formal writing it is still preferable to capitalize them, though
    the lower-case "am" and "pm" are now so popular they are not likely to
    get you into trouble.

    Occasionally computer programs encourage you to write "AM" and "PM"
    without a space before them, but others will misread your data if you
    omit the space. The nonstandard pattern of omitting the space is
    spreading rapidly, and should be avoided in formal writing.


    ABJECT

    "Abject" is always negative, meaning "lowly" or "hopeless." You can't
    experience "abject joy" unless you're being deliberately paradoxical.

    ABLE TO

    People are able to do things, but things are not able to be done: you
    should not say, "the budget shortfall was able to be solved by selling
    brownies."

    ABOUT

    "This isn't about you." What a great rebuke! But conservatives sniff at
    this sort of abstract use of "about," as in "I'm all about good taste"
    or "successful truffle-making is about temperature control"; so it's
    better to avoid it in very formal English.

    ABSTRUSE/OBTUSE

    Most people first encounter "obtuse" in geometry class, where it labels
    an angle of more than 90 degrees. Imagine what sort of blunt arrowhead
    that kind of angle would make and you will understand why it also has a
    figurative meaning of "dull, stupid." But people often mix the word up
    with "abstruse," which means "difficult to understand."

    When you mean to criticize something for being needlessly complex or
    baffling, the word you need is not "obtuse," but "abstruse."

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    ACADEMIA

    Although some academics are undoubtedly nuts, the usual English-language
    pronunciation of "academia" does not rhyme with "macadamia." The third
    syllable is pronounced "deem." Just say "academe" and add "ee-yuh."

    However, there's an interesting possibility if you go with
    "ack-uh-DAME-ee-yuh: although some people will sneer at your lack of
    sophistication, others will assume you're using the Latin pronunciation
    and being learned.

    ACCEDE/EXCEED

    If you drive too fast, you exceed the speed limit. "Accede" is a much
    rarer word meaning "give in," "agree."

    ACCENT MARKS

    In what follows, "accent mark" will be used in a loose sense to include
    all diacritical marks that guide pronunciation. Operating systems and
    programs differ in how they produce accent marks, but it's worth
    learning how yours works. Writing them in by hand afterwards looks
    amateurish.

    Words adopted from foreign languages sometimes carry their accent marks
    with them, as in "fiance" "protege," and "cliche." As words become more
    at home in English, they tend to shed the marks: "Cafe" is often spelled
    "cafe." Unfortunately, "resume" seems to be losing its marks one at a
    time (see under "vita/vitae").

    Many computer users have not learned their systems well enough to
    understand how to produce the desired accent and often insert an
    apostrophe (curled) or foot mark (straight) after the accented letter
    instead: "cafe'." This is both ugly and incorrect. The same error is
    commonly seen on storefront signs.

    So far we've used examples containing acute (right-leaning) accent
    marks. French and Italian (but not Spanish) words often contain grave
    (left-leaning) accents; in Italian it's a caffe. It is important not to
    substitute one kind of accent for the other.

    The diaeresis over a letter signifies that it is to be pronounced as a
    separate syllable: "noel" and "naive" are sometimes spelled with a
    diaeresis, for instance. The umlaut, which looks identical, modifies the
    sound of a vowel, as in German Fraulein (girl), where the accent mark
    changes the "frow" sound of Frau (woman) to "froy." Rock groups like
    "Blue Oyster Cult" scattered umlauts about nonsensically to create an
    exotic look.

    Spanish words not completely assimilated into English like pinata and
    nino retain the tilde, which tells you that an "N" is to be pronounced
    with a "Y" sound after it. In English-language publications accent marks
    are often discarded, but the acute and grave accents are the ones most
    often retained.
    edited by PRIncess on 9/23/2008

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    ACCESS/GET ACCESS TO

    "Access" is one of many nouns that's been turned into a verb in recent
    years. Conservatives object to phrases like "you can access your account
    online." Substitute "use," "reach," or "get access to" if you want to
    please them.

    ACCESSORY

    There's an "ack" sound at the beginning of this word, though some
    mispronounce it as if the two "C's" were to be sounded the same as the
    two "SS's."

    ACCIDENTLY/ACCIDENTALLY

    You can remember this one by remembering how to spell "accidental."
    There are quite a few words with -ally suffixes (like "incidentally")
    which are not to be confused with words that have "-ly" suffixes (like
    "independently"). "Incidental" is a word, but "independental" is not.

    ACCURATE/PRECISE

    In ordinary usage, "accurate" and "precise" are often used as rough
    synonyms, but scientists like to distinguish between them. Someone could
    say that a snake is over a meter long and be accurate (the snake really
    does exceed one meter in length), but that is not a precise measurement.
    To be precise, the measurement would have to be more exact: the snake is
    1.23 meters long. The same distinction applies in scientific contexts to
    the related words "accuracy" and "precision."

    ACRONYMS AND APOSTROPHES

    One unusual modern use of the apostrophe is in plural acronyms, like
    "ICBM's" "NGO's" and "CD's". Since this pattern violates the rule that
    apostrophes are not used before an S indicating a plural, many people
    object to it. It is also perfectly legitimate to write "CDs," etc. See
    also "50's." But the use of apostrophes with initialisms like "learn
    your ABC's and "mind your P's and Q's" is now so universal as to be
    acceptable in almost any context.

    Note that "acronym" was used originally only to label pronounceable
    abbreviations like "NATO," but is now generally applied to all sorts of
    initialisms. Be aware that some people consider this extended definition
    of "acronym" to be an error.

    ACROSSED/ACROSS

    The chicken may have crossed the road, but did so by walking across it.

    ACTIONABLE/DOABLE

    "Actionable" is a technical term referring to something that provides
    grounds for a legal action or lawsuit. People in the business world have
    begun using it as a fancy synonym for "doable" or "feasible." This is
    both pretentious and confusing.

    ACTUAL FACT/ACTUALLY

    "In actual fact" is an unnecessarily complicated way of saying
    "actually."

    AD NAUSEUM/AD NAUSEAM

    Seeing how often "ad nauseam" is misspelled makes some people want to
    throw up.

    ADD/AD

    "Advertisement" is abbreviated "ad," not "add."

    ADAPT/ADOPT

    You can adopt a child or a custom or a law; in all of these cases you
    are making the object of the adoption your own, accepting it. If you
    adapt something, however, you are changing it.

    ADDICTING/ADDICTIVE

    Do you find beer nuts "addicting" or "addictive"? "Addicting" is a
    perfectly legitimate word, but much less common than "addictive," and
    some people will scowl at you if you use it.

    ADMINISTER/MINISTER

    You can minister to someone by administering first aid. Note how the
    "ad" in "administer resembles "aid" in order to remember the correct
    form of the latter phrase. "Minister" as a verb always requires "to"
    following it.

    ADMINISTRATE/ADMINISTER

    Although it is very popular with administrators and others, many people
    scorn "administrate" as an unnecessary substitute for the more common
    verb form "administer."
    edited by PRIncess on 9/24/2008

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    ADVANCE/ADVANCED

    When you hear about something in advance, earlier than other people, you
    get advance notice or information. "Advanced" means "complex,
    sophisticated" and doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the
    revealing of secrets.

    ADVERSE/AVERSE

    The word "adverse" turns up most frequently in the phrase "adverse
    circumstances," meaning difficult circumstances, circumstances which act
    as an adversary; but people often confuse this word with "averse," a
    much rarer word, meaning having a strong feeling against, or aversion
    toward.

    ADVICE/ADVISE

    "Advice" is the noun, "advise" the verb. When Ann Landers advises
    people, she gives them advice.

    ADVISER/ADVISOR

    "Adviser" and "advisor" are equally fine spellings. There is no
    distinction between them.

    ADVOCATE FOR/ADVOCATE

    When they are acting as advocates for a cause, people often say they are
    "advocating for"--say--traffic safety. This is not as widely accepted as
    "campaigning for" or "working toward." Saying you are "advocating for
    the blind" leaves a lot of listeners wondering what it is you advocate
    for them. If you can substitute "advocate" for "advocate for," you
    should do so: "I advocate for higher pay for teachers" becomes "I
    advocate higher pay for teachers."

    AESTHETIC/ASCETIC

    People often encounter these two words first in college, and may confuse
    one with the other although they have almost opposite connotations.
    "Aesthetic" (also spelled "esthetic") has to do with beauty, whereas
    "ascetic" has to do with avoiding pleasure, including presumably the
    pleasure of looking at beautiful things.

    St. Francis had an ascetic attitude toward life, whereas Oscar Wilde had
    an esthetic attitude toward life.

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    hi yaar!!
    could u tel me one thing...which of da folloowin is da correct usage??

    'i want to talk to u' OR 'i want to talk with u'
    PGDIM NITIE Mumbai 2011-13

    CAT 2011 : Quant |DI/LR/DS

    New thread : Word Usage

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    Post Common Errors made while writing n speaking

    Hi,
    ‘Tusharsem’ if you are really interested in the correct usage of English, your sentence would read like this:
    I would like to talk ‘to’ you.
    We could converse ‘with’ each other.
    If you avoid the use of ‘yaar’ in your salutation it would be a step in the right direction. It's cool to address people as ‘Dude’ or ‘guys’ or just a plain and simple ‘Hi’.

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    AFFLUENCE/EFFLUENCE

    Wealth brings affluence; sewage is effluence.

    AFRICAN AMERICAN

    AFRICAN AMERICAN

    There have been several polite terms used in the US to refer to
    persons of African descent: "colored," "negro," "Black,"
    "Afro-American," and "African American." "Colored" is definitely dated,
    though "people of color" is now widely used with a broader meaning,
    including anyone with non-European ancestry, sometimes even when their
    skin is not discernibly darker than that of a typical European. A few
    contemporary writers like to defy convention by referring to themselves
    as "negro." "Black," formerly a proudly assertive label claimed by young
    radicals in the 1960s, is now seen by some people as a racist insult.
    Some people insist on capitalizing "Black," but others prefer "black."
    The safest and most common neutral term is "African American," but
    Americans sometimes misuse it to label people of African descent living
    in other countries or even actual Africans. To qualify as an "African
    American" you have to be an American.

    Although it is traditional to hyphenate "African-American,"
    "Irish-American," "Cuban-American," etc., there is a recent trend toward
    omitting the hyphen, possibly in reaction to the belittling phrase
    "hyphenated Americans." However, some styles still call for the hyphen
    when the phrase is used adjectivally, so that you might be an African
    American who enjoys African-American writers. Omitting the hyphen may
    puzzle some readers, but it's not likely to offend anyone.

    AFTERALL/AFTER ALL

    "After all" is always two words.

    AFTERWARDS/AFTERWORDS

    Like "towards," "forwards," and "homewards," "afterwards" ends with
    -wards.

    "Afterwords" are sometimes the explanatory essays at the ends of books
    or speeches uttered at the end of plays or other works. They are made up
    of words.

    AGNOSTIC/ATHEIST

    Both agnostics and atheists are regularly criticized as illogical by
    people who don't understand the meaning of these terms. An agnostic is a
    person who believes that the existence of a god or gods cannot be proven
    or known. Agnosticism is a statement about the limits of human
    knowledge. It is an error to suppose that agnostics perpetually hesitate
    between faith and doubt: they are confident they cannot know the
    ultimate truth. Similarly, atheists believe there are no gods. Atheists
    need not be able to disprove the existence of gods to be consistent just
    as believers do not need to be able to prove that gods do exist in order
    to be regarded as religious. Both attitudes have to do with beliefs, not
    knowledge.

    "Agnostic" is often used metaphorically of any refusal to make a
    judgment, usually on the basis of a lack of evidence; people can be
    agnostic about acupuncture, for instance, if they believe there is not
    enough evidence one way or another to decide its effectiveness.

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    Great Posts Princess ...Keep them coming
    B-School Joiners,Please Click
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    Quant Thread RC ThreadVerbal Thread Leisure
    PGP Batch IIM Indore 2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by sumit2goody
    Great Posts Princess ...Keep them coming
    Hey thanks a lot!! Ur appreciation is appreciated!! lol ...

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    AIN'T

    "Ain't" has a long and vital history as a substitute for "isn't,"
    "aren't" and so on. It was originally formed from a contraction of "am
    not" and is still commonly used in that sense. Even though it has been
    universally condemned as the classic "mistake" in English, everyone uses
    it occasionally as part of a joking phrase or to convey a down-to-earth
    quality. But if you always use it instead of the more "proper"
    contractions you're sure to be branded as uneducated.

    AISLE/ISLE

    An aisle is a narrow passageway, especially in a church or store; an
    isle is an island. Propose to the person you're stranded on a desert
    isle with and maybe you'll march down the aisle together after you're
    rescued.

    ALL BE IT/ALBEIT

    "Albeit" is a single word meaning "although": "Rani's recipe called for
    a tablespoon of saffron, which made it very tasty, albeit rather
    expensive." It should not be broken up into three separate words as "all
    be it," just as "although" is not broken up into "all though."

    ALL

    Put this word where it belongs in the sentence. In negative statements,
    don't write "All the pictures didn't show her dimples" when you mean
    "The pictures didn't all show her dimples."

    ALL AND ALL/ALL IN ALL

    "The dog got into the fried chicken, we forgot the sunscreen, and the
    kids started whining at the end, but all in all the picnic was a
    success." "All in all" is a traditional phrase which can mean "all
    things considered," "after all," or "nevertheless." People unfamiliar
    with the traditional wording often change it to "all and all," but this
    is nonstandard.


    ALL FOR NOT/ALL FOR NAUGHT

    "Naught" means "nothing," and the phrase "all for naught" means "all for
    nothing." This is often misspelled "all for not" and occasionally "all
    for knot."

    ALL GOES WELL/AUGURS WELL

    Some folks who don't understand the word "augur" (to foretell based on
    omens) try to make sense of the common phrase "augurs well" by mangling
    it into "all goes well." "Augurs well" is synonymous with "bodes well."

    ALL OF THE SUDDEN/ALL OF A SUDDEN

    An unexpected event happens not "all of the sudden" but "all of a
    sudden."

  26. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIncess
    Hi Friends let's avoid all possible errors in wriiten n spoken english.. I'll be adding to this thread daily.. U'll also can contribute to it..

    Great job PRINCESS !!

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    ALL READY/ALREADY

    "All ready" is a phrase meaning "completely prepared," as in "As soon as
    I put my coat on, I'll be all ready." "Already," however, is an adverb
    used to describe something that has happened before a certain time, as
    in "What do you mean you'd rather stay home? I've already got my coat
    on."

    ALLEGED, ALLEGEDLY

    Seeking to avoid prejudging the facts in a crime and protect the rights
    of the accused, reporters sometimes over-use "alleged" and "allegedly."
    If it is clear that someone has been robbed at gunpoint, it's not
    necessary to describe it as an alleged robbery nor the victim as an
    alleged victim. This practice insultingly casts doubt on the honesty of
    the victim and protects no one. An accused perpetrator is one whose
    guilt is not yet established, so it is redundant to speak of an "alleged
    accused." If the perpetrator has not yet been identified, it's pointless
    to speak of the search for an "alleged perpetrator."

    ALLITERATE/ILLITERATE

    Pairs of words which begin with the same sound are said to alliterate,
    like "wild and wooly." Those who can't read are illiterate.

    ALLS/ALL

    "Alls I know is . . ." may result from anticipating the "S" in "is," but
    the standard expression is "All I know is. . . ."

    ALLUDE/ELUDE

    You can allude (refer) to your daughter's membership in the honor
    society when boasting about her, but a criminal tries to elude (escape)
    captivity. There is no such word as "illude."

    ALLUDE/REFER

    To allude to something is to refer to it indirectly, by suggestion. If
    you are being direct and unambiguous, you refer to the subject rather
    than alluding to it.

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    ALLUSION/ILLUSION

    An allusion is a reference, something you allude to: "Her allusion to
    flowers reminded me that Valentine's Day was coming." In that English
    paper, don't write "literary illusions" when you mean "allusions." A
    mirage, hallucination, or a magic trick is an illusion. (Doesn't being
    fooled just make you ill?)

    ALLUSIVE/ELUSIVE/ILLUSIVE

    When a lawyer alludes to his client's poor mother, he is being allusive.
    When the mole keeps eluding the traps you've set in the garden, it's
    being elusive. We also speak of matters that are difficult to
    understand, identify, or remember as elusive. Illusions can be illusive,
    but we more often refer to them as illusory.

    ALMOST

    Like "only," "almost" must come immediately before the word or phrase it
    modifies: "She almost gave a million dollars to the museum" means
    something quite different from "She gave almost a million dollars to the
    museum." Right? So you shouldn't write, "There was almost a riotous
    reaction when the will was read" when what you mean is "There was an
    almost riotous reaction."

    ALONG THE SAME VEIN/IN THE SAME VEIN, ALONG THE SAME LINE

    The expressions "in the same vein" and "along the same line" mean the
    same thing (on the same subject), but those who cross-pollinate them to
    create the hybrid "along the same vein" sound a little odd to those who
    are used to the standard expressions.


    ALOT/A LOT

    Perhaps this common spelling error began because there does exist in
    English a word spelled "allot" which is a verb meaning to apportion or
    grant. The correct form, with "a" and "lot" separated by a space is
    perhaps not often encountered in print because formal writers usually
    use other expressions such as "a great deal," "often," etc.

    You shouldn't write "alittle" either. It's "a little."

    ALOUD/ALLOWED

    If you think Grandma allowed the kids to eat too much ice cream, you'd
    better not say so aloud, or her feelings will be hurt. "Aloud" means
    "out loud" and refers to sounds (most often speech) that can be heard by
    others. But this word is often misused when people mean "allowed,"
    meaning "permitted."

    ALRIGHT/ALL RIGHT

    The correct form of this phrase has become so rare in the popular press
    that many readers have probably never noticed that it is actually two
    words. But if you want to avoid irritating traditionalists you'd better
    tell them that you feel "all right" rather than "alright."

    ALTAR/ALTER

    An altar is that platform at the front of a church or in a temple; to
    alter something is to change it.

    ALTERIOR/ULTERIOR

    When you have a concealed reason for doing something, it's an ulterior
    motive.

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    Hey Princess,

    You've got a lot of time at your hand dude. Truly like and congratualte your inputs. Pls. keep these going on. really require these at this point in time to CAT

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    ALTERNATE/ALTERNATIVE

    Although UK authorities disapprove, in US usage, "alternate" is
    frequently an adjective, substituted for the older "alternative": "an
    alternate route." "Alternate" can also be a noun; a substitute delegate
    is, for instance, called an "alternate." But when you're speaking of
    "every other" as in "our club meets on alternate Tuesdays," you can't
    substitute "alternative."

    ALTOGETHER/ALL TOGETHER

    "Altogether" is an adverb meaning "completely," "entirely." For example:
    "When he first saw the examination questions, he was altogether
    baffled." "All together," in contrast, is a phrase meaning "in a group."
    For example: "The wedding guests were gathered all together in the
    garden." Undressed people are said in informal speech to be "in the
    altogether" (perhaps a shortening of the phrase "altogether naked").

    ALUMNUS/ALUMNI

    We used to have "alumnus" (male singular), "alumni" (male plural),
    "alumna" (female singular) and "alumnae" (female plural); but the latter
    two are now popular only among older female graduates, with the first
    two terms becoming unisex. However, it is still important to distinguish
    between one alumnus and a stadium full of alumni. Never say, "I am an
    alumni" if you don't want to cast discredit on your school. Many avoid
    the whole problem by resorting to the informal abbreviation "alum."

    AMATURE/AMATEUR

    Most of the words we've borrowed from the French that have retained
    their "-eur" endings are pretty sophisticated, like "restaurateur"
    (notice, no "N") and "auteur" (in film criticism), but "amateur"
    attracts amateurish spelling.

    AMBIGUOUS/AMBIVALENT

    Even though the prefix "ambi-" means "both," "ambiguous" has come to
    mean "unclear," "undefined," while "ambivalent" means "torn between two
    opposing feelings or views." If your attitude cannot be defined into two
    polarized alternatives, then you're ambiguous, not ambivalent.

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