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  1. #1
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    Default How to solve the Cryptogram

    For all you guys who are finding it difficult to solve the cryptogram, check out the solution of this puzzle.

    POW - 18 Sept

    In a cryptogram a letter is substituted with a symbol or another letter. Eg. If U equals A, then every letter instance of U needs to be replaced with A.

    After that, the entire solution is based on one's intuition via the trail and error method. Here are a few tips that one can use to solve a cryptogram.

    1. One can look for one-letter words. The single letter is, more often than not, 'a' or 'I'. The exact letter can be determined by examining the use of the letter in other words. If a three-letter word begins with that same letter, it is almost certain that the letter is "a". There are more common three-letter words beginning with "a" than with "I".

    2. Try to identify the vowels. If you can find five letters with these properties, you have very likely identified the vowels. Vowels account for almost 40% of the letters in English text and are almost present in every word. The most common vowel is "e"; the least common is "u".

    3. The word "the" is extremely common and can be identified by finding words like "that", "there", "then" or "than".

    4. If you get "t," "h," "n," "e," and "a" solved, you're almost through.

    5. A single letter after an apostrophe is usually either "t", "s", or more rarely "d". Two letters after an apostrophe usually indicate "re" if the letters are different or "ll" if both letters are the same.

    6. Conjunctions like "but" or "and" often follow commas. A question mark often implies a "wh" in the clause preceding it.

    7. Look for pairs of two-letter words, one beginning and the other ending with the same letter. That letter has a good chance of being "n," "o," "s," or "t," and the second letter of the word which starts with the shared letter is likely to be "f," "n," "o," "r," "s," or "t."

    8. If you find two two-letter words where the letters are reversed, you've got either "no" and "on." You just have to figure out which is which!
    Last edited by TestFunda; 08-May-13 at 10:33 AM.

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to TestFunda For This Useful Post:

    AaryaZelin (12-Oct-11), styxnexus (11-May-10), sumit2goody (06-Apr-10)

  3. #2
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    Default

    The following can also help....

    Use the frequency of the symbols and correlate it to the alphabets.
    Link to articles that teach you how to decode
    More On How To Break Codes
    Code Crackers

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to niharikam For This Useful Post:

    sumit2goody (06-Apr-10)

  5. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by niharikam View Post
    The following can also help....

    Use the frequency of the symbols and correlate it to the alphabets.
    Link to articles that teach you how to decode
    More On How To Break Codes
    Code Crackers
    Am using this now and I found this code here also a few weeks ago, thanks!

  6. #4
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    Default

    If you can get "t," "h," "n," "e," and "a" solved, you're well on your way to finishing the puzzle.

    The order of letters used in the English Language is usually listed as: E,T,A,O,I,N,S,H,R,D,L,U,C,W,M,F,Y,G,P,B,V,K,J,X,Q,Z.

    An unlikely expression often found in ciphers is "The magic words are squeamish ossifrage," a tribute to the famous solution to a 1977 encryption challenge.

    Most puzzle setters ensure that their cryptograms replace each letter with a different letter. So if the cyphertext has the word "A" and it could stand for either "A" or "I", it probably stands for "I".

    Try solving the puzzle without writing anything down. It takes concentration, but you can recover much more quickly if you make a mistaken assumption (no messy erasing). Besides, you'll get a great feeling of accomplishment the first few times you do this.

    Common short words are: Am, Be, Do, Is, / Are, Can, Did, Had, Has, May, Was, / Been, Does, Have, Must, Were, Will, / Being, Could, Shall, Might, Would / Should.

    In a substitution cipher, it is possible to determine words based on the number, frequency and order of letters. For example the text ABCCD represents a 5 character word where characters 3 and 4 are the same, and the other 3 are unique. This encrypted word may represent the word "Hello".

    When you think you cracked a single word, start testing your cracked code on other words in the text.
    Last edited by TestFunda; 08-May-13 at 10:32 AM.

  7. #5
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    Default

    Nice thread

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